2021 - 2022 College Catalog 
    
    Jan 20, 2022  
2021 - 2022 College Catalog

Course Descriptions


 

Horticulture

  
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    HORT 155 - Sharpening and Grinding


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Laboratory Hours: 3 extra hours as needed

    Prerequisite(s): HORT 150 

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course consists of the study of the principles and practices of sharpening tools and equipment used in golf- course operations. Special emphasis is placed on grinding and lapping cutting blades for mowing equipment.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. To develop an awareness for safety in handling mowing equipment during sharpening operations.
    2. To have each student acquire a functional, working knowledge of the basic principles of sharpening reel mowers.
    3. To acquaint the student with the principles of the operation, adjustment, and maintenance of mower drive systems.
    4. To develop the ability to diagnose wear patterns on cutting surfaces.
    5. To enable the student to acquire the ability to back lap and correctly adjust reel mowers to manufactures specifications.
    6. To have each student acquire a functional, working knowledge of the basic principles of sharpening rotary mowers.
  
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    HORT 160 - Soil Science


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Laboratory Hours: 3

    Prerequisite(s): None

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This is an introductory soils course. Topics include soil genesis, composition, and physical and chemical characteristics in relation to soil moisture and fertility. Students learn basic soil testing procedures with horticultural applications and use test results to correct soil imbalances through a variety of methods such as liming fertilization and adding organic matter to soils.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Have a understanding of the types of soils
    2. Understand the physical, chemical, and biological properties of soils
    3. Understand how nutrients move through the soil and into the plant
    4. Understand soils and their impact on various plant material such as agricultural crops, turf, and nursery
  
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    HORT 180 - Horticulture Sciences Internship


    Credit Hours: 1
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): Full-time matriculated status in the Horticulture Science, Golf & Sports Turf Managment AAS or BBA programs and a minimum cumulative 2.00 GPA

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course provides students with a unique technical experience by combining theoretical and hands- on training. The course will be completed at a recognized internship site chosen in conjunction with a faculty advisor. Students must spend a minimum of 180 hours or six weeks at an internship site in order to satisfactorily complete this requirement.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Students will have the opportunity to bridge the gap between theory and practice from the classroom to their internship experience.
    2. The course will prepare the student for a career in their chosen field.
    3. The course will demonstrate what will be expected of them in the profession upon graduation.
    4. The course will reinforce information and skills learned while attending SUNY Delhi courses.
    5. Students will demonstrate the ability to research job/internship opportunities.
    6. Students will prepare a professional resume and cover letter.
    7. Students will complete a professional, credit bearing experience within industry that will complement course work studied.
  
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    HORT 200 - Turfgrass Management


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Laboratory Hours: 2

    Prerequisite(s): HORT 150 , HORT 160  

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This is a course in the identification and uses of major turfgrasses. This course also covers procedures for turfgrass management, maintenance, and protection through soil preparation, seeding, sodding, fertilization, liming, irrigation, mowing, and control of insects, diseases, and weeds

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Identify the major cool-season turfgrasses to species, differentiate between turfgrass species, and articulate strengths and weaknesses of particular species in certain settings/application.
    2. Determine and articulate the proper methods of establishing cool season turf grasses.
    3. Utilize various reference materials to assist in arriving at solutions to turfgrass related problems.
    4. Understand and apply the basic principles and terminology used in the care, growth, propagation, growing media, soil amendments, and fertilization of turf.
    5. Demonstrate knowledge of the operation of equipment used on golf courses, athletic fields, landscapes.
    6. Demonstrate a thorough understanding of soil: its genesis, composition, classification, physical and chemical characteristics; and how to test, correct, and implement proper soil management practices on golf courses.
    7. Display a thorough, practical understanding of the daily operations on a golf course, athletic field, and residential lawn.
    8. Properly identify, select, establish, and maintain major turfgrasses
    9. Understand how plant growth regulators (PGRs) are used in turf and how to schedule their applications.
  
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    HORT 201 - Hort. Special Projects II


    Credit Hours: 1
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Laboratory Hours: 3

    Prerequisite(s): HORT 101 

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This is a supplementary course to HORT 101 . This course will require students to be involved in many horticultural plant management projects on the SUNY Delhi Campus, College Golf Course, the Town/Village of Delhi and surrounding communities. With guidance from the instructor/facility superintendent, students will be provided with a variety of projects they participate in. Some project examples include, but are not limited to garden renovation and/or installation, reading plans, measuring and laying out materials, irrigation installation and repairs, drainage installation, turfgrass cultural practices, pruning, planting, mulching, staking/guying, and other related operations. Students will be expected to show a progression from the basic tasks learned in HORT 101 . Students will also gain managerial skills as they will be required to train HORT 101  students on various horticulture management tasks.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Demonstrate the day-to-day operations in the horticulture maintenance industry
    2. Identify many of the common ornamental and weed plants
    3. Plan for basic daily horticulture cultural/maintenance for proposed projects
    4. Determine the  proper the tools and equipment used for horticulture cultural/maintenance practices
  
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    HORT 207 - Horticultural Insects and Diseases


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Laboratory Hours: 3

    Prerequisite(s): HORT 120 , HORT 130  

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course covers the insects and diseases of ornamental plants. Among the topics emphasized are” identification, life cycle, history, significance, and anatomy as it relates to pest identification.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course: Pathology section;

    1. Identify common diseases of trees, shrubs, herbaceous, turf, indoor and greenhouse plants.
    2. Understand the life cycle of diseases and the horticultural significance of each stage of the life cycle.
    3. Recognize symptoms and signs of disease damage and be able to separate those from caused by arthropods or abiotic pathogens.
    4. Explain the differences among the various diseased examined and be able to identify an unknown disease.
    5. Demonstrate proficiency at using references to identify diseases and treat disease.
    6. Apply techniques of sampling to actual disease populations.
    7. Determine the appropriate control method using the principles of Integrated Pest Management.
    8. Distinguish between diseases caused by virus, bacteria, fungi, and apparently similar conditions caused by abiotic conditions (weather for example), mites, nematodes etc.
    9. Understand various fungicide families and their modes of action (MoA)

    Entomology section

    1. Understand basic concepts in plant pathology and entomology as they relate to ornamental plants.
    2. Describe, demonstrate, and apply the basic theories of Integrated Pest Management (IPM) practices.
    3. Properly identify, select cultural, biological, mechancial, or chemical control options for arthropod pests.
    4. Properly identify and manage turf pests found on home lawns and athletic fields.
    5. Understand basic concepts in plant pathology and entomology as they relate to turf grass and ornamental plants.
    6. Describe, demonstrate, and apply the basic theories of Integrated Pest Management (IPM) practices used on lawns and athletic fields.

  
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    HORT 212 - Horticulture Chemicals


    Credit Hours: 1
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): HORT 130 , HORT 207  

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course focuses on the role of pesticides and associated chemicals in modern agriculture. Proper use and safe application are emphasized. Topics include natural vs man made pesticides relative toxicity, application techniques and the calibration of application equipment. Usage recommendations by Cornell Cooperative Extension are incorporated into the course. Class instruction provides preparation for the NYSDEc Pesticide Applicators exam.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Have the ability to sit for the NYSDEC pesticide license and pass
    2. Know how to safely and effectively use pesticides
    3. Be able to effectively implement IMP strategies into turf and ornamental growing systems
  
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    HORT 220 - Ornamental Tree and Shrub Maintenance


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Laboratory Hours: 3

    Prerequisite(s): HORT 130 , HORT 160  

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course is concerned with the establishment and maintenance of ornamental woody plants. The plants and their environmental influences; cultural field practices; major problems; selection and evaluation are important topics. Transplanting, pruning, and fertilizing trees and shrubs under field conditions are applied learning experiences. Emphasis is placed on safe working practices used in tree and shrub care; working with hand tools, ropes and equipment.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. The student will understand the science and function of woody plants and how they grow in a landscape setting.
    2. The student will be able to diagnose and perform cultural techniques to maintain ornamentals in a landscape.
    3. The student will monitor the safety of plants and the work required.
    4. The student will be able to evaluate planting sites and recommend the selection of appropriate plants.
  
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    HORT 225 - Water Management and Conservation


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Laboratory Hours: 3

    Prerequisite(s): HORT 140 , HORT 160 , and HORT 200  

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course is designed to cover all aspects of water management from two distinct perspectives. The first shall include the efficient design and delivery of irrigations systems, system components, conservation of water for use in urban environments including turf, horticulture and landscape construction management. In addition the course shall address grading and drainage issues such as reading and interpreting grading and drainage plans, understanding the best management practices of storm water management, impacts of site disturbance and the protection of water as a potable and habitat resource

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Understand various environmental issues related to irrigation and storm water management
    2. Understand the need for applying, managing and conserving water resources
    3. Understand the economic and regulatory concerns with water conservation and storm water management
    4. Understand the basic properties of water dynamics and hydraulics
    5. Understand plant irrigation requirements for various plant species and environments for proper application
    6. Identify different water sources for irrigation, including the use of effluent or recycled waste water
    7. Identify the changes of storm water prior and after site alterations.
    8. Identify the elements that impact storm water velocity, volume and time of concentration.
    9. Inventory & evaluate existing site conditions that may impact irrigation and storm water management.
    10. Design irrigation systems and grading solutions for environmental sensitivity and functional sustainability.
  
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    HORT 235 - Weeds and Weed Control


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Laboratory Hours: 3

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 210

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    Students learn the growth patterns and identification of important weed species as well as the biological, cultural, and chemical control methods.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Describe the concepts and principles of weed biology, morphology, and control.
    2. To identify common turf and ornamental weeds.
    3. Describe the life cycles and strategies weeds use to reproduce.
    4. Determine the appropriate methods of control of both ornamental and turf weed.
    5. Know the concepts and terms related to herbicide weed control.
    6. Describe herbicide selectivity and how it is important in weed control.
    7. Understand mode of action (MOA) and the various reasons of its importance.
  
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    HORT 240 - Plant Production


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Laboratory Hours: 3

    Prerequisite(s): None

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course will introduce students to many of the basic principles utilized in the production of horticultural crops. The techniques used for plant propagating, producing, managing, and marketing of commercial bedding plants will be emphasized.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course: Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    1. Identify common house plants; annual, biennial and perennial ornamental herbaceous plants
    2. Use the proper propagation techniques to produce a crop of herbaceous ornamentals
    3. Identify common types of herbaceous gardens
    4. Identify structures and equipment used in the production of horticultural crops
    5. Understand how environmental factors are managed to control plant growth
    6. Learn the cultural procedures and practices used to successfully grow selected crops
    7. Apply business management principles to a commercial horticulture production setting
  
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    HORT 250 - Advanced Turfgrass Management


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Laboratory Hours: 3

    Prerequisite(s): HORT 200  

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This is a supplemental course to HORT 200 . Selected subjects from the earlier course such as plant morphology, id, and cultural practices are discussed on a more advanced level. Additional areas such as golf course management, athletic field management, business management of turf operations, and discussions of new technology in the field are also included.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Have a more thorough understanding of turf management practices and their effects on plant physiology
    2. Understand water balance in plants and how water moves within plants
    3. Have an in depth understanding of various plant hormones and how they play a role in fine turf management
    4. Understand various plant stressors and what affect they have on plants physiology
  
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    HORT 260 - Planting Design


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Laboratory Hours: 3

    Prerequisite(s): HORT 140  and HORT 130  or permission of the instructor

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course offers an introduction to the theory and principles of landscape design and their application to residential and commercial sites. Students are taught how to achieve an overall aesthetic and functional development of land areas through design principles and the proper use of plant materials.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course: Upon completion of this course, students shall be able to do the following:

    1. Inventory and interpret at least 5 major environmental conditions and the way they impact functional use and plant selection for successful landscape designs.
    2. Apply standard industry and clearly communicate with graphic symbols and drawing techniques design ideas.
    3. Apply design principles to planting designs for aesthetically pleasing plant combinations.
    4. Develop good oral and listening communication skills when meeting with clients to understand their needs and underlying concerns.
    5. Identify and understand the similarities and differences of work performed between landscape architects, landscape/garden designers, landscape contractors, and related professions typical to the industry to better understand how these all work together.
    6. Incorporate landscape materials and design layout to develop sustainable designs.
    7. Design outdoor rooms with an understanding of the basic elements that define these spaces and relate them to human needs.
  
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    HORT 265 - Advanced Landscape Design and Practices


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Laboratory Hours: 3

    Prerequisite(s): HORT 140  HORT 260  

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course reinforces basic landscape construction installation and introduces advanced landscape construction practices, i.e. green roof installation, etc. In addition, this course teaches students how to: read construction documents for material and job cost estimating; prepare complete bids; schedule job equipment and workers; use of computer aided design software to produce drawings; and install landscapes from construction documents.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Utilize basic drawing and surveying tools to prepare accurate drawings from data collected.
    2. Explain basic construction principles and materials used for decks, fences, patios, walks, and retaining walls.
    3. Select, when appropriate, advanced construction techniques and materials used for sustainable pracites as in energy and resource conservation, protection of environmentally sensitive sites as well as safety concerns, accessibility issues, etc.
    4. Distinguish the unique design considerations between residential and commercial/industrial projects.
    5. Analyze construction documents for use in obtaining material quantities, labor estimates, job scheduling and coordination of work.
  
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    HORT 296 - Advanced Study in Horticulture - lower division


    Credit Hours: 1-4
    Lecture Hours: 1-4
    Laboratory Hours: 1-4

    Prerequisite(s): None

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    The faculty member and student develop an area of study not within an approved course. Advanced study provides a very able and highly motivated student the opportunity to explore a topic of study in greater depth and breadth.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Demonstrate the ability to work independently.
    2. Demonstrate proficiency in the specific area of study.
  
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    HORT 301 - Hort. Special Projects III


    Credit Hours: 1
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Laboratory Hours: 3

    Prerequisite(s): HORT 101 , HORT 201 

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This is a course that follows successful completion of HORT 101  and HORT 201  and is for students enrolled in the Horticulture Management OR Landscape Management BBA programs.  This course will require students to be involved in facility construction, maintenance and/or management projects on the SUNY Delhi Main and Valley Campuses or College Golf Course. With guidance from the instructor/facility superintendent, students will be provided with a variety of projects to give further experience to become competent in skills introduced in earlier coursework. Some project examples include, but are not limited to monitoring, maintenance and management of: campus greenhouses, woody plant display gardens, woody/herbaceous plant nursery, and raised garden beds; installation of new amenities (hardscapes, hydroponic systems, etc.); and other related operations which reflect current industry technologies and trends. Students will continue to gain managerial, planning, design, and specialized installation skills. A portion of this course will include the introduction of the calibration, mixing and application of organic horticultural chemicals as pesticides and fertilizers.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Explain tasks typical to the day to day management of a horticulture facility
    2. Demonstrate the use of specialized horticultural facility equipment
    3. Identify varieties and cultivars of local ornamental woody plant species and their cultural requirements
    4. Examine best business practices found at noted successful horticulture facilities
    5. Take part in the proper calibration, mixing and application of horticultural chemicals as pesticides and fertilizers
  
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    HORT 330 - Hort. Plant Production II


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Laboratory Hours: 3

    Prerequisite(s): HORT 120 , BIOL 155 

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course will cover many of the basic principles utilized in greenhouse and nursery operations and management; commercial herbaceous and woody plant propagation techniques; production planning; determining cost and profit; pest and disease management; and greenhouse and nursery layout and operations. Discussions will also address the growth processes of plants, plant structure and function, fertilization practices, media, propagation structures and plant selection.          

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Identify standard plant propagation structures, construction materials, construction methods, environmental regulators and siting considerations.
    2. Evaluate various production techniques used in the propagation of woody and perennial plant production for container and field grown materials
    3. Maximize crop success using appropriate techiques for propagating various herbaceous and woody greenhouse crops/plants via: seeding, cuttings, grafting and tissue culture.
    4. Compare the operation and management concepts between wholesale, re-wholesale and retail greenhouses/nurseries.
  
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    HORT 335 - Sustainable Hort. Practices


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): HORT 120 , BIOL 155  or Permission of Instructor

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course will cover the planning, design, propagation and management of plants, indoors or outdoors. Utilizing current scientific knowledge about our environment, materials and current technologies, students will learn how to conserve the earth’s natural resources; utilize materials best suited for their intended use and climate; and design landscapes where function and aesthetics provide nominal maintenance, maximum pleasure and integrate with the natural systems.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Elaborate on the basic concepts of sustainable horticultural planning, design, installation and management practices
    2. Distinguish between organic, permaculture and sustainable practices in horticulture
    3. Justify the cost and environmental benefits of sustainable horticultural practices
    4. Defend the importance of conserving natural resources, minimizing pollution and providing habitat opportunities for the native flora and fauna
  
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    HORT 401 - Hort. Special Projects IV


    Credit Hours: 1
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Laboratory Hours: 3

    Prerequisite(s): HORT 101 , HORT 201  & HORT 301  

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    As the last in the sequence of special projects classes, this course for seniors enrolled in the Horticulture Management OR Landscape Management BBA programs, is designed to provide real-life planning, management, and employee/job supervisory experiences.  This course will require students to take managerial responsibilities as they are related to facility construction, maintenance and/or management projects on the SUNY Delhi Main and Valley Campuses or College Golf Course. With guidance from the instructor/facility superintendent, students will be project leaders in which they will develop plans, obtain cost estimates and create a work schedule on an as needed basis. To install the project, students in HORT 301  may be utilized as crew members. Some project examples include, but are not limited to new or renovation of existing woody plant display gardens, woody/herbaceous plant nursery, and raised garden beds; installation of new amenities (i.e. cold frames or overwintering structures); and other related operations. Students in this course may also teach the calibration, mixing and application of organic horticultural chemicals as pesticides and fertilizers.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Plan tasks typical to the day to day management of a horticulture facility
    2. Choose the proper specialized horticultural facility equipment per project
    3. Select the most appropriate varieties and cultivars of local ornamental woody plant species and based on their cultural requirements
    4. Develop planning and budgeting documents for the operation horticulture facilities and facility projects
    5. Determine the proper calibration, mixing and application of horticultural chemicals as pesticides and fertilizers
  
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    HORT 496 - Advanced Study in Horticulture - upper division


    Credit Hours: 1-4
    Lecture Hours: 1-4
    Laboratory Hours: 1-4

    Prerequisite(s): None

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    The faculty member and student develop an area of study not within an approved course. Advanced study provides a very able and highly motivated student the opportunity to explore a topic of study in greater depth and breadth.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Demonstrate the ability to work independently.
    2. Demonstrate proficiency in the specific area of study.

Hospitality

  
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    HOSP 100 - Orientation to Hospitality Management


    Credit Hours: 1
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): None

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    The purpose of the orientation course is to provide the student with a basic definition, comprehension and overall understanding of the scope of the hospitality and tourism industry. The information and lectures presented in-class and on advisory board day will provide the student with an opportunity to identify with business and corporate leaders. Students will gain insight on the prediction of future trends and opportunities and understand how these will affect their future career goals and objectives. The course will also guide the student to academic services, practices, and attitudes that will lead to success within SUNY Delhi’s Hospitality Management Department through meetings with faculty advisors and support services offices from across campus.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Identify personal and professional goals and develop an action plan for their achievement
    2. Demonstrate the importance of professional attire and etiquette by adhering to departmental expectations and industry standards
    3. Demonstrate an awareness of campus based resources
    4. Explore and identify career and professional opportunities to begin resume development
    5. Recognize and apply available and emerging technologies
    6. Adhere to classroom policies and demonstrate/exhibit professional behavior
  
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    HOSP 105 - Fundamentals of Hospitality Management


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): None

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course introduces students to career opportunities in the hospitality industry from operations management to ownership. Students will investigate segments of the industry including food and beverage management, culinary arts, casino and gaming management, lodging management, club management, and travel and tourism management. A particular emphasis will also be placed on developing critical leadership and management skills and understanding how to identify forces affecting the growth and change of the hospitality industry.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Investigate the history of the hospitality industry and current trends driving change
    2. Explain how changing demographics impact the demand for hospitality services
    3. Differentiate the sectors of the hospitality industry and their respective characteristics and career opportunities
    4. Identify and discuss the impact of key hospitality leaders
    5. Evaluate leadership and management styles relevant to the hospitality industry
    6. Recognize and apply available and emerging technologies
    7. Adhere to classroom policies and demonstrate/exhibit professional behavior
  
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    HOSP 110 - Basic Food Preparation and Standards


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): None

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): HOSP 115 

    This course gives students a comprehensive understanding of basic food cookery, industry terminology, product identification, and the use and care of foodservice equipment. Lecture, demonstration, and laboratory formats are utilized.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Identify and describe primal and retail cuts of various meats and their treatment
    2. Identify common ingredients used in the Restaurant & foodservice profession and their subsequent uses
    3. Identify the quality standards and production of properly made stocks and sauces
    4. Describe and identify the practices of proper safety and sanitation principles
    5. Describe and identify cooking methods and used culinary terminology
    6. Recognize and apply available and emerging technologies
    7. Adhere to classroom policies and demonstrate/exhibit professional behavior
  
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    HOSP 115 - Basic Food Preparation and Standards Laboratory


    Credit Hours: 1
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Laboratory Hours: 3

    Prerequisite(s): None

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): HOSP 110  

    This course provides students with a basic understanding of food production, terminology, and the care and use of foodservice equipment.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Complete basic food production
    2. Demonstrate proper use and care of food service equipment
    3. Recognize and identify product standards
    4. Practice acceptable food safety and sanitation standards of professional cooking
    5. Recognize and apply available and emerging technologies
    6. Adhere to classroom policies and demonstrate/exhibit professional behavior
  
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    HOSP 120 - Food Production, Planning and Purchasing


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): HOSP 110  and HOSP 115  

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): HOSP 125  

    This food management course covers food purchasing, receiving, and issuing; food and beverage control areas; yield analysis; and production concerns. The elements of proper table service and wine service are covered as well as front-of-the-house management controls. Bakery products, standards, and ingredients are studied and applied in the accompanying lab. The laboratory project provides students with the opportunity to apply basic fundamentals of food preparation and management.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Identify quality standards of bakeshop products
    2. Identify proper cooking methods, storage, and handling of common ingredients
    3. Compare and contrast characteristics of French, Russian and American and butler service and table setups
    4. Demonstrate proper wine service techniques
    5. Explain the roles of the host and manager in a successful foodservice operation
    6. Discuss the purpose of the menu, standardized recipes, forecasts, popularity index and reservation systems
    7. Write a proper food specification
    8. Describe and use the proper forms for receiving, storing and the issuing of food products for control
    9. Recognize and apply available and emerging technologies
    10. Adhere to classroom policies and demonstrate/exhibit professional behavior
  
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    HOSP 125 - Food Production, Planning and Purchasing Laboratory


    Credit Hours: 1
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Laboratory Hours: 4

    Prerequisite(s): HOSP 110  and HOSP 115 

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): HOSP 120 

    This course provides students with a basic understanding of bakery ingredients, production, and equipment. Laboratory projects allow students opportunities to apply the fundamentals of menu planning, food costing, purchasing, production, service, and management.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Identify quality standards of bakeshop and other food products, including texture, appearance and flavor
    2. Demonstrate safe use, care and storage of equipment and smallwares
    3. Identify and use common ingredients
    4. Prepare bakeshop and other food products using proper techniques
    5. Exhibit knowledge of traditional management foodservice management theory and practice
    6. Demonstrate a realistic understanding of how to operate a restaurant, including food preparation, customer service, purchasing and management control tools
    7. Recognize and apply available and emerging technologies
    8. Adhere to classroom policies and demonstrate/exhibit professional behavior
  
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    HOSP 130 - Menu Planning and Controls


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3 or 4
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): None

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course presents the menu as a major management tool for foodservice operations. The menu and its role as a merchandising mechanism and vehicle for the presentation of food and beverage products will be included. Pricing of food and beverage products and the role of cost controls in a foodservice operation are addressed. Menu types, forms, and design will be presented.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Convert measurements and costs relative to calculating recipe cost
    2. Compute food costs and selling prices for specific menu items using standard recipes, yield percent and weight/volume conversion information
    3. Define considerations involved in menu layout and design
    4. Identify the physical characteristics of a good menu
    5. Recognize and apply available and emerging technologies
    6. Develop a conceptual business outline for a food service operation
    7. Design a menu with a well-defined concept, appropriate items and effective descriptions
    8. Adhere to classroom policies and demonstrate/exhibit professional behavior
  
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    HOSP 135 - Applied Foodservice Sanitation


    Credit Hours: 1
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): None

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This is an operations-centered certification course that provides students with basic sanitation principles, ways to apply them in practical situations, and methods of training and motivating employees to follow good sanitation practices.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Define food-borne illness and list causes
    2. Identify appropriate steps to prevent contamination
    3. Define best practices for personnel and facilities management
    4. Recognize and apply available and emerging technologies
    5. Adhere to classroom policies and demonstrate/exhibit professional behavior
  
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    HOSP 140 - Beverage and Beverage Control


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Laboratory Hours: 2

    Prerequisite(s): None

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    Students are exposed to the identification, history, manufacture, and use of malted beverages, wines, and distilled spirits as well as to how, when, and where they relate to a beverage operation. Purchasing and control of a bar inventory and legal, moral, and social obligations of proper beverage service are also covered. Laboratory sessions allow for demonstration and practice of correct procedures of mixology.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Demonstrate knowledge of the history of alcohol and its impact on society and bar development
    2. Differentiate an understanding of alcohol products and how they are produced
    3. Identify knowledge of bar equipment, glassware, and service standards
    4. Document understanding of managerial controls through application of standard operating procedures
    5. Recognize and apply available and emerging technologies 6. Adhere to classroom polices and demonstrate/exhibit professional behavior
  
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    HOSP 200 - Foundations of Beer and Brewing


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): HOSP 105  and sophomore standing

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This class will teach students about the history of beer and brewing, the origins of the global craft beer revolution and the how-tos of beer appreciation, from brewing to tasting to judging to food pairing. A portion of the class is dedicated to the operational details of a beer-focused establishment.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Demonstrate how specifications are determined for malting barley and hops that are used in the production of various craft beers
    2. Describe the various parameters used for quality measurements of beer
    3. Explain and demonstrate how sensory assessment of beer is conducted
    4. Analyze the effects of variations in ingredient quality and how they can impact the brewing process
    5. Summarize the importance of effective operations management in a craft brewing environment
    6. Illustrate the fundamentals of consumer behavior with reference to marketing in the beverage industry
    7. Recognize and apply available and emerging technologies
    8. Adhere to classroom policies and demonstrate/exhibit professional behavior
  
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    HOSP 205 - Hospitality Management


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s):  Two semesters in a Hospitality program

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    Traditional management theory, leadership and management roles, organizational structure and change, service, quality, decision-making, empowerment, and ethics are the foundation of this course. Additional topics include communication, management information systems, planning and control, productivity, and financial management.

  
  •  

    HOSP 210 - Hospitality Human Resources


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): None

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    Fundamental information, approaches, functions, and forms of human resource management are applied to the hospitality/ tourism service industry to enable managers to accomplish company goals. Topics include federal employment legislation, pre-employment, multiculturalism, labor market fundamentals, recruitment, interviewing, selection, hiring, training, evaluation, discipline, compensation, and benefits.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Analyze the impact of laws affecting human resources
    2. Apply theoretical and conceptual ideas in planning and staffing
    3. Develop human resources functions utilizing industry best practices
    4. Evaluate compensation and labor issues
    5. Identify issues relative to safety, discipline, and ethics
    6. Recognize and apply available and emerging technologies
    7. Adhere to classroom policies and demonstrate/exhibit professional behavior
  
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    HOSP 215 - Hospitality Marketing


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): None

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course provides students with an overview of basic marketing and sales principles and their application to the hospitality industry. This applied marketing approach to the sales and marketing of the hospitality industry and its specialized products provides students with specific industry methods, trends, and attitudes required to successfully market and sell within the hospitality industry. The major components are reviewed, including industry marketing definitions, principles, and sales tools.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Define terminology commonly used in marketing
    2. Discuss the evolution of marketing approaches.
    3. Identify relevant consumer segmentation
    4. Identify internal and external forces impacting marketing strategy
    5. Create a prototype property applying marketing concepts
    6. Recognize and apply available and emerging technologies
    7. Adhere to classroom policies and demonstrate/exhibit professional behavior
  
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    HOSP 220 - Nutrition I


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Laboratory Hours: 3

    Prerequisite(s): None

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    Basic principles and facts related to carbohydrates, fats, proteins, vitamins, minerals, and water are provided in the context of promoting health and preventing disease. Current topics such as world food problems, cholesterol, obesity, and vegetarian diets are also considered. The course is intended primarily for Hospitality students.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Describe nutritional guidelines
    2. Understand food composition and specific nutrients and identify foods necessary to maintain and promote health and prevent disease
    3. Recognize reliable sources of nutrition information
    4. Plan and market nutritionally sound menus
    5. Analyze recipes, menus, and personal dietary intake utilizing computerized technology
    6. Modify recipes using healthy ingredients and cooking techniques
    7. Discuss nutritional concerns of particular segments of the population and utilize special products to address these concerns
    8. Discuss agricultural and environmental issues of concern in the hospitality industry
    9. Recognize and apply available and emerging technologies
    10. Adhere to classroom policies and demonstrate/exhibit professional behavior
  
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    HOSP 230 - Introduction to Casino Operations


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): None

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    A look at the historical growth and development of casinos in America and around the world and the role they play in our society today. The course will cover a detailed look at Gaming Control, Gaming Regulations, Casino Accounting and Cash Control, an Introduction to Table Games-Sports Book Operations-Race Operations, Effective Player Rating & The Premium Player, and Security and Surveillance.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Identify the role of government and how it regulates the casino and gaming industry
    2. Identify the role of security and surveillance in the casino and gaming industry
    3. Discuss the most popular types of gambling including table games, horse racing, and lotteries
    4. Identify the future of gaming and the role the internet will play
    5. Recognize and apply available and emerging technologies
    6. Adhere to classroom policies and demonstrate/exhibit professional behavior
  
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    HOSP 235 - Professional Experience


    Credit Hours: 1
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Laboratory Hours: 40

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of at least one semester, full-time matriculated status in a Hospitality program

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    A full-time summer employment experience in the hospitality and tourism industry, this course is designed to provide a professionally significant addition to a student’s body of knowledge. Eight weeks of 40 hours per week or a total of 320 hours is required.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Apply knowledge, skills, and abilities acquired through formal classroom instruction to a professional setting
    2. Evaluate challenges experienced on the job and demonstrate practical and managerial skills used to resolve them
    3. Document achievement of organizational goals and objectives through the completion of employer and self-evaluations
    4. Exhibit effective written and oral communication skills
    5. Demonstrate professionalism as outlined by the SUNY Delhi Hospitality Management Department and the organizations standards
  
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    HOSP 240 - Hospitality Internship


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Laboratory Hours: 40

    Prerequisite(s): Two semesters of study with a minimum 2.0 cumulative GPA

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    The Hospitality Internship provides students with direct work experience in the hospitality or travel industry. Students are placed in industry positions with the assistance of their academic advisors and department faculty. A contract is developed between the employer, student, and academic advisor outlining the goals and objectives of the internship as well as standards of performance and evaluation procedures. Delhi’s strong relationship with the hospitality and travel industries provides students with work experiences ranging from Marriott to Disney.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Properly communicate with subordinates
    2. Demonstrate and monitor proper safety and sanitation principles and practices
    3. Identify common kitchen and dining room problems and provide solutions
    4. Demonstrate ability to expedite coordinate
    5. Develop evaluative proficiency 
    6. Model appropriate professional behavior
  
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    HOSP 250 - Wine, Life and Society


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): Must be 18 years old

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course will introduce our students to the finer points of alcoholic beverages and food as they relate to life and social entertainment. Discussion of wine culture, the making pairings for all the beverages covered in the course. of wine, wine’s transition from the vineyard to the table and pairing to food will take place. Beer and spirits as related to food will also be explored. Students will research wine styles, wine pairings, and the relationships of wine, beer and spirits. The students will also participate in tasting wine, beer, spirits, sake, tea and coffee.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Apply knowledge of wine making, geography, and viticulture
    2. Identify differences and characteristics of various wines through tastings
    3. Research various aspects of wine to understand its complexity from the growing process to consumption
    4. Recognize and apply available and emerging technologies.
    5. Adhere to classroom policies and demonstrate/exhibit professional behavior.
  
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    HOSP 260 - Food and Service Fundamentals


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): HOSP 135  

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): HOSP 265  

    This course will give the student a comprehensive understanding of basic foods cookery, industry terminology, product identification, sanitation and the use and care of foodservice equipment. Additionally, the elements of traditional foodservice management are covered, including proper table and wine service.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Describe and identify the practices of safety and sanitation principle
    2. Identify and describe primal and retail cuts of various proteins
    3. Describe classical cooking and baking techniques
    4. Identify common ingredients used in professional foodservice and their subsequent applications
    5. Identify characteristics of various types of proper food and beverage service
    6. Identify and describe the various roles and tools used in professional foodservice management
    7. Recognize and apply available and emerging technologies
    8. Adhere to classroom policies and demonstrate/exhibit professional behavior
    1. Describe and identify the practices of safety and sanitation principle
    2. Identify and describe primal and retail cuts of various proteins
    3. Describe classical cooking and baking techniques
    4. Identify common ingredients used in professional foodservice and their subsequent applications
    5. Identify characteristics of various types of proper food and beverage service
    6. Identify and describe the various roles and tools used in professional foodservice management
    7. Recognize and apply available and emerging technologies
    8. Adhere to classroom policies and demonstrate/exhibit professional behavior
    1. Describe and identify the practices of safety and sanitation principle
    2. Identify and describe primal and retail cuts of various proteins
    3. Describe classical cooking and baking techniques
    4. Identify common ingredients used in professional foodservice and their subsequent applications
    5. Identify characteristics of various types of proper food and beverage service
    6. Identify and describe the various roles and tools used in professional foodservice management
    7. Recognize and apply available and emerging technologies
    8. Adhere to classroom policies and demonstrate/exhibit professional behavior
    1. Describe and identify the practices of safety and sanitation principle
    2. Identify and describe primal and retail cuts of various proteins
    3. Describe classical cooking and baking techniques
    4. Identify common ingredients used in professional foodservice and their subsequent applications
    5. Identify characteristics of various types of proper food and beverage service
    6. Identify and describe the various roles and tools used in professional foodservice management
    7. Recognize and apply available and emerging technologies
    8. Adhere to classroom policies and demonstrate/exhibit professional behavior
  
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    HOSP 260A - Food/Service Fundamentals


    Credit Hours: 4
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 3

    Prerequisite(s): Dean’s signature

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course will give the student a comprehensive understanding of basic foods cookery, industry terminology, product identification, sanitation and the use and care of food service equipment.  Additionally, the elements of traditional food service management are covered, including proper table and wine service. Students will have hands-on experience with basic food cookery, basic baking skills, terminology, and the care and use of food service equipment.  Laboratory projects and final team buffet allow students opportunities to apply the fundamentals of menu planning, food costing, purchasing, production, service, and management.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Describe and identify the practices of safety and sanitation principle
    2. Identify and describe primal and retail cuts of various proteins
    3. Describe classical cooking and baking techniques
    4. Identify common ingredients used in professional foodservice and their subsequent applications
    5. Identify characteristics of various types of proper food and beverage service
    6. Identify and describe the various roles and tools used in professional foodservice management
    7. Demonstrate safe use, care and storage of knives, equipment and small wares
    8. Apply proper cooking and baking techniques utilizing safety and sanitation principles
    9. Demonstrate competency in basic food preparation, cooking, and proper utilization of common ingredients
    10. Apply traditional management theory and practices through the role of project manager As a team, execute all phases of a banquet function applying current standards
    11. Recognize and apply available and emerging technologies
    12. Adhere to classroom policies and demonstrate/exhibit professional behavior
  
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    HOSP 265 - Food and Service Fundamentals Laboratory


    Credit Hours: 1
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Laboratory Hours: 4

    Prerequisite(s): HOSP 135  

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): HOSP 260  

    This course provides students with hands-on experience with basic food cookery, basic baking skills, terminology, and the care and use of foodservice equipment. Laboratory projects and final team buffet allow students opportunities to apply the fundamentals of menu planning, food costing, purchasing, production, service, and management.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Demonstrate safe use, care and storage of knives, equipment and small wares
    2. Apply proper cooking and baking techniques utilizing safety and sanitation principles
    3. Demonstrate competency in basic food preparation, cooking, and proper utilization of common ingredients
    4. Apply traditional management theory and practices through the role of project manager As a team, execute all phases of a banquet function applying current standards
    5. Recognize and apply available and emerging technologies
    6. Adhere to classroom policies and demonstrate/exhibit professional behavior
  
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    HOSP 296 - Advanced Study in Hospitality - lower division


    Credit Hours: 1-4
    Lecture Hours: 1-4
    Laboratory Hours: 1-4

    Prerequisite(s): None

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    The faculty member and student develop an area of study not within an approved course. Advanced study provides a very able and highly motivated student the opportunity to explore a topic of study in greater depth and breadth.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Demonstrate the ability to work independently.
    2. Demonstrate proficiency in the specific area of study.
  
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    HOSP 310 - Training & Development for the Hospitality Industry


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): HOSP 105  and HOSP 210 , or permission of the instructor

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course is designed to develop critical-thinking, analysis, decision-making, and management skills related to hospitality human resources management. The case study method, collaborative learning and hands-on projects are the primary vehicles for instruction.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Explain the importance of training to the effective operation of the hospitality organization
    2. Interpret and examine levels of employee productivity to assess training needs
    3. Identify and critically evaluate current and prospective training techniques and tools
    4. Differentiate between management and line level training best practices and explain how each can be applied within specific hospitality organizations
    5. Appraise effectiveness of training tools, techniques, and methods to determine success and areas for future improvement
    6. Determine whether in-house training or outsourcing is most effective for organizational success
    7. Recognize and apply available and emerging technologies
    8. Adhere to classroom policies and demonstrate/exhibit professional behavior
  
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    HOSP 320 - Hospitality Financial Management


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 125  and ECON 100  or ECON 110  

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    The purpose of this course is to analyze the financial planning process and the financial operating methods available to the hospitality firm. The continuously changing operating environment faced by finance managers associated with the hospitality/tourism industry is emphasized.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Prepare cash budgets using cash receipts and disbursements and net income approaches
    2. Compare and contrast methods of capital projects assessment to determine highest return
    3. Assess assets, liabilities, and equity of a hospitality firm
    4. Evaluate the financial status of a company using financial ratios relevant to the hospitality industry
    5. Explain how finance is interrelated with other organizational areas of the firm
    6. Forecast and prepare operations budgets for financial planning
    7. Prepare an income statement in proper format including summary sheet and supplementary schedules
    8. Identify ethical concerns that the hospitality financial manager must consider
  
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    HOSP 330 - Hospitality Strategic Mktg


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): BUSI 245  or HOSP 215  

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course is designed around a thorough analysis of employing marketing strategies to gain sustainable competitive advantages within the hospitality industry. Emphasis is placed on internal analysis, assessment of market structure, competitor evaluation, and strategic planning and implementation within a global hospitality market. Case studies are employed to evaluate current trends and assist in applying the theoretical class material to real-world applications.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Identify and compare different marketing programs based upon existing companies
    2. Explain the difference between hospitality related services versus hospitality related products and identify services and/or products that complement one another and their impact of marketing
    3. Identify and give specific examples of the six characteristics of a hospitality system
    4. Compare and contrast a market analysis from a feasibility analysis
    5. Conduct one or more forms of market research and be able to apply to a marketing plan for an existing organization
    6. Identify and discuss trends relative to the hospitality and/or tourism industry
    7. Identify and interpret marketing terminology relative to a specific, existing organization
    8. Develop a prototype hospitality strategic marketing plan
  
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    HOSP 335 - Purchasing for the Hospitality Industry


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): CULN 180  and CULN 280  or REST 280  or BKNG 280  or EVNT 280 , or permission of the instructor

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course expands the concepts of the purchasing function and supply management for hospitality operations. Emphasis is placed on quality and quantity standards while maintaining strict cost control systems throughout the procurement chain. This advanced course builds on the basics attained in a variety of hospitality courses and requires product research and analysis within the industry. The material is divided into three principal categories: the purchasing function, including accountability, distribution network, purchase options, legal/ethical issues, exterior and interior controls, and industry trends; identification, quality and control of the major food groups and beverages, including yield analysis; and specification and selection of the non-food commodities of equipment, furniture, linens, carpets, chemicals, paper products, and services.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Apply generally accepted principles and procedures of selection and procurement in the hospitality industry
    2. Analyze specific product characteristics, especially their market distribution, quality standards, and other selection factors
    3. Prepare product specifications
    4. Recognize and apply available and emerging technologies
    5. Adhere to classroom policies and demonstrate/exhibit professional behavior
  
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    HOSP 350 - Hospitality Law


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): Second-year status or permission of the instructor

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course is designed to teach students to identify and understand the principles and concepts of laws affecting the hospitality industry. The focus is on prevention of liability and protection against accidents, attitudes, and incidents that could lead to lawsuits. Case study and discussion examine the applications of law to the hospitality industry. Group projects, research, and use of the Internet may be required.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Discuss specific purposes of the legal system and relate these to decisions rendered by the courts
    2. Define legal terms required to understand principles of hospitality law and understand the concept of negligence as it applies to innkeepers, hoteliers, restaurateurs, and travel agents
    3. Explain the scope of obligation, liability and civil rights laws
    4. Describe the concepts of contract law and its application to the hospitality industry
    5. Recognize the effect of the following concepts on business: alcohol liability, agency relationships, licensing, and regulation.
  
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    HOSP 470 - Hospitality Management Seminar


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): Senior status in Hospitality B.B.A. program and/or by advisement

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    An integrative summary course for senior bachelor’s degree students, this seminar provides an opportunity for students to inquire, research, and contribute as part of a student-oriented group-study program. Teaching methods include lectures, case studies, shared inquiry, and management games. Readings relevant to current topics in the industry are required.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Define and discuss the necessary actions that must be taken to be prepared for management position within the hospitality industry
    2. Articulate the characteristics of effective entrepreneurs and identify resources available to individuals seeking to develop their own businesses within the hospitality industry
    3. Synthesize knowledge of customer service and value to understand its impacts on profitability
    4. Examine traditional and contemporary theories of leadership to formulate personal mission statements and leadership philosophies
    5. Demonstrate an understanding of effective organizational change management through active debate and discussion of the Eight Stage Change Model and its applicability to the hospitality industry
    6. Formulate a personal and organizational framework for ethical and socially responsible decision making and managerial behavior
  
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    HOSP 496 - Advanced Study in Hospitality - upper division


    Credit Hours: 1-4
    Lecture Hours: 1-4
    Laboratory Hours: 1-4

    Prerequisite(s): None

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    The faculty member and student develop an area of study not within an approved course. Advanced study provides a very able and highly motivated student the opportunity to explore a topic of study in greater depth and breadth.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Demonstrate the ability to work independently.
    2. Demonstrate proficiency in the specific area of study.

Hotel

  
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    HTEL 160 - Hotel Front Office Management and Guest Relations


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): None

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course introduces students to front-office operations and management, and to the accounting function as it relates to the front office. It also introduces successful strategies and operational tactics used by front-desk professionals for day-to-day operations, as well as employee management techniques that are important to the success of the front office.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Identify the role of the front office relative to hotel operations
    2. Develop standard operating procedures for the front office function
    3. Apply guest service skills to address customer needs
    4. Develop strategies to maximize profits while maximizing revenues and minimizing costs
    5. Recognize and apply available and emerging technologies
    6. Adhere to classroom policies and demonstrate/exhibit professional behavior
  
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    HTEL 165 - Lodging Accommodations Management


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): None

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    Students learn to appreciate the key role housekeeping plays in the operation of a successful hotel. The course covers the care of guest rooms and public areas, as well as purchasing, storage, and procedures used by hotel housekeeping departments to assure a safe, comfortable stay for guests.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Identify the role that housekeeping plays in effective lodging properties
    2. Demonstrate how to efficiently and effectively care for guest rooms and public spaces
    3. Develop skills pertaining to budgeting, purchasing and managing inventory
    4. Utilize chemicals, equipment and supplies appropriately
    5. Recognize relevant human resources issues
    6. Recognize and apply available and emerging technologies
    7. Adhere to classroom policies and demonstrate/exhibit professional behavior
  
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    HTEL 310 - Hotel Maintenance and Engineering


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): HTEL 160  or permission of the instructor

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    Hotel Maintenance and Engineering is designed to afford the student with an introduction and overview of the problems inherent in a hospitality facility and the role of management in understanding the problems/challenges of the engineering and maintenance function. Principles studied and explored will include, but are not limited to basic maintenance and engineering concepts, analysis of engineering data and the language necessary to communicate with engineering personnel and to other departments with regard to problems and situations that may or will affect the entire hotel operation. Upon completion of the course, students should be able to discuss the organization and responsibilities of the engineering department within a typical hotel organization, understand the language used in a discussion of engineering challenges and opportunities, and how to make decisions based upon sound and organized data presented from blueprints and organizational/system charts. In addition students will be exposed to and be asked to demonstrate an understanding of the fiscal responsibilities associated with the maintenance and engineering department (both human and physical resources); blueprints of a hotel (rooms, food and beverage outlets, office and meeting space, etc.); heating, ventilating, air conditioning, electrical, water safety and sound systems as they relate to hotels; and an appreciation of management operations/responsibilities and how they are integral to the effective operation of the hospitality organization.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Articulate the importance of properly maintained and functioning facilities to profitable hospitality organizations
    2. Discuss the impact of preventive maintenance in providing high levels of customer service and limiting costly replacement of furniture, fixtures, equipment, and capital investments through analysis of current trends and best practices
    3. Demonstrate the importance of becoming and remaining environmentally and sustainability-minded when developing and maintaining hospitality facilities
    4. Discuss the importance of each of the components of the facility system and building envelope
    5. Apply theoretical and conceptual ideas of facility design including site selection, feasibility studies, engineering, budgeting, evaluation of plans and blueprints
    6. Demonstrate knowledge of renovations, procedures and timeframes as well as the importance of planning for capital investments and long-term projects
  
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    HTEL 420 - Hotel and Resort Operations


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): HOSP 105 ; HOSP 210  or HOSP 310 ; or permission of the instructor

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course provides students with an in-depth look at management positions and the impact of new technology on the operation of the hotel/resort property. Students will be prepared to develop creative strategies for effectively managing change and resolving conflict while meeting the expectations of management, guests, employees, and government agencies.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Explain the hotel development process from real estate acquisition through opening day
    2. Discuss the organizational design of hotels including the organizational chart, lines of authority, and chain of command
    3. Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the priorities of all senior management positions
    4. Discuss the roles of key management positions in food and beverage, marketing and revenue management, financial/accounting and information management, and human resources.
    5. Describe the scope of the hotel, resort and spa industry and associated career tracks
    6. Explain the major lodging brands and the market segment each brand targets

Humanities

  
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    HUMN 100 - Elementary French I


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): None

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course is designed to introduce the student to French grammatical structures and vocabulary through the active development of listening, reading, speaking, and writing skills, along with exposure to elements of French and Francophone culture. The focus of the course in on the present tense to communicate about aspects of daily life. This course is intended for students with no more than two years of high school French.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Basic proficiency in the understanding and use of a foreign language; and
    2. Knowledge of the distinctive features of culture associated with the French language.
  
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    HUMN 101 - Art Appreciation


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): None

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course surveys basic art principles and concepts together with their historical development as shown in representative works of painting, sculpture, and architecture.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course: SUNY GE 8: Students will demonstrate understanding of at least one principal form of artistic expression and the creative process inherent therein.

    Students will be able to:

    1. Identify the elements of art, and principles of design using descriptive language; and articulate supported interpretations of select works.
    2. Create original artwork in which students effectively utilize the elements of art and principles of design to demonstrate key characteristics of select styles/periods.
    3. Identify select artworks, artists, and styles/periods in the history of art.
    4. Explain major developments in the history of art, and how socio-cultural change has affected artists.

  
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    HUMN 102 - Introduction to Music


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): None

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course involves appraisal of the art of music. Recorded and visual materials are utilized in studying the elements, forms, and styles of music with the aim of stimulating understanding and enjoyment.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Demonstrate knowledge of the conventions and methods of at least one of the humanities in addition to those encompassed by other knowledge areas required by the General Education program.
  
  •  

    HUMN 104 - Latinos in the United States


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): None

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This interdisciplinary course investigates the Latino experience in the United States. Students will utilize texts from various disciplines (including history, sociology, linguistics, literature, film, and the arts) to examine the roles of the diverse and ever-changing Latino population of the United States. The course will consider topics such as identity, class, race and ethnicity, gender and sexuality, immigration, language use, media, and popular culture. Students will be able to recognize the complex and varied nature of the Latino experience in the United States and to articulate how the Latino experience contributes to a broader conceptualization of American culture and identity.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course: GE 7:

    1. Students will demonstrate knowledge of the conventions and methods of at least one of the humanities in addition to those encompassed by other knowledge areas required by the General Education program.
    2. Social and Cultural Understanding: Students should be able to identify and explain theories, concepts, and systems with respect to individual, societal, and cultural behavior.
    3. Relevance: Students should be able to demonstrate the ability to articulate the societal and/or personal relevance of their studies through reflection.
  
  •  

    HUMN 105 - Elementary French II


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): HUMN 100  or at least two years of high school French.

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course is a continuation of HUMN 100  and introduces the student to more complex French grammatical structures and vocabulary through the active development of listening, reading, speaking, and writing skills, along with exposure to elements of French and Francophone culture. The focus of the course is on the use of the past tenses to describe the past and narrate events in the past.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Basic proficiency in the understanding and use of a foreign language; and
    2. Knowledge of the distinctive features of culture associated with the French language.
  
  •  

    HUMN 106 - Medical Spanish


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): None

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course is intended for students studying or working in health-related fields. It functions as a beginning level Spanish language course, with a special focus on medical terminology and cultural awareness relevant to a medical setting. This course will prepare students for interactions with Spanish-speaking patients in future careers in medicine, nursing, social work, and mental health. 

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. basic proficiency in the understanding and use of a foreign language by successfully completing medically related tasks and interactions, such as taking patient complaints and medical history and defining symptoms; and
    2. knowledge of the distinctive features of culture(s) associated with the language they are studying by articulating an awareness of and reflecting on matters of immigration, diverse customs, worldviews, and communication styles.
  
  •  

    HUMN 110 - Intermediate French I


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): HUMN 105  or two years of high-school French with permission of the instructor

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course is for students who have some ability in French. Students must have skill in grammatical construction and sentence structure.  The emphasis of the course is on greater facility in reading, writing, speaking, and understanding French, including a study of representative selections from French literature.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. basic proficiency in the understanding and use of a foreign language; and
    2. knowledge of the distinctive features of culture(s) associated with the language they are studying.
  
  •  

    HUMN 115 - Intermediate French II


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): HUMN 105  or two years of high-school French with permission of the instructor.

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    The emphasis of this course is on greater facility in reading, writing, speaking, and understanding French, including a study of representative selections from French literature.  More advanced conversational French is included.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. basic proficiency in the understanding and use of a foreign language; and
    2. knowledge of the distinctive features of culture(s) associated with the language they are studying.
  
  •  

    HUMN 120 - Elementary Spanish I


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): None

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course is designed to introduce the student to Spanish grammatical structures and vocabulary through the active development of listening, reading, speaking, and writing skills, along with exposure to elements of Hispanic culture. The focus of the course is on the use of the present tense to communicate about aspects of daily life. This course is intended for students with no more than two years of high school Spanish.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course: Students will demonstrate:

    1. basic proficiency in the understanding and use of a foreign language; and
    2. knowledge of the distinctive features of culture(s) associated with the language they are studying.
  
  •  

    HUMN 125 - Elementary Spanish II


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): HUMN 120  or at least two years of high-school Spanish

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course is a continuation of Elementary Spanish I and introduces the student to more complex Spanish grammatical structures and vocabulary through the active development of listening, reading, speaking, and writing skills, along with exposure to elements of Hispanic culture. The focus of the course is on the use of the past tenses to describe the past and narrate events in the past.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course: Students will demonstrate:

    1. basic proficiency in the understanding and use of a foreign language; and
    2. knowledge of the distinctive features of culture(s) associated with the language they are studying.
  
  •  

    HUMN 137 - American Sign Language I


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): None

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This is an introductory level course to expose students to American Sign Language (ASL). Cultural, linguistic and historical issues will be introduced via spoken lecture. The focus of the course will allow the student to develop a beginner’s competency in the expressive and receptive usage of ASL. Emphasis will be placed on development of vocabulary and “conversation” within break-out groups. There will be a policy of “no-voice” during break-out groups and sign instruction.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Basic proficiency in the understanding and use of a foreign language.
    2. Knowledge of the distinctive features of culture(s) associated with the language they are studying.
  
  •  

    HUMN 138 - American Sign Language II


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): HUMN 137  

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    Continuation in the exploration of American Sign Language. Specific focus will be placed on continued development of vocabulary, fingerspelling, linguistics, classifiers, expressive & receptive skills, competency in conversations as well as history and culture of the Deaf.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Basic proficiency in the understanding and use of a foreign language
    2. Knowledge of the distinctive features of culture(s) associated with the language they are studying.
  
  •  

    HUMN 160 - Introduction to Mythology


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): None

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course is an introductory survey of myths, epics, and legends of both the ancient and the new world. The course explores these myths and emphasizes human similarities that span time and place.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course: SUNY GE 7 HUMANITIES

    Students will demonstrate:

    1. knowledge of the conventions and methods of at least one of the humanities in addition to those encompassed by other knowledge areas required by the General Education program.

  
  •  

    HUMN 165 - Introduction to Film


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): None

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course surveys the basic concepts, forms, genres, and techniques of film, including the technical aspects of mise-en-sce, cinematography, editing, and sound, in addition to narrative.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. show proficiency with the specialized vocabulary, historical context and breadth of the field (measures the conventions of one area of the humanities);
    2. develop an interpretation and / or argument in response to a text or texts (measures the conventions and methods of one area of the humanities).
  
  •  

    HUMN 170 - Philosophy


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 100  or ENGL 200  or permission of the instructor

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course is a study of philosophical problems such as the nature of humankind, mind, God, soul, knowledge, truth, reality, evil, death, beauty, freedom, and morality.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course: Students will demonstrate:

    1. knowledge of the conventions and methods of at least one of the humanities in addition to those encompassed by other knowledge areas required by the General Education program.
  
  •  

    HUMN 180 - Ethics


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 100  or ENGL 200  or permission of the instructor

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course is an introduction to ethical inquiry and involves application of basic ethical principles to a variety of moral issues.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Show proficiency with the specialized vocabulary and historical contexts of the field of literary studies
    2. Demonstrate an ability to synthesize ideas from primary and/or secondary sources
    3. Evaluate the aesthetic and didactic aspects of a text
  
  •  

    HUMN 195 - Theater Arts


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): None

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course is an introductory study of theater as a performance art. Special attention is given to the technical and artistic elements in stage performances. Study units include: the actor, the director, the theater space, the production elements, and dramatic forms.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Show proficiency with the specialized vocabulary and historical contexts of the field of literary studies
    2. Demonstrate an ability to synthesize ideas from primary and/or secondary sources
    3. Evaluate the aesthetic and didactic aspects of a text
  
  •  

    HUMN 205 - Introduction to Gender Studies


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 100  or ENGL 200  

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course introduces students to the ideas and literature of feminist and gender theory, such as those represented in women’s studies, masculinity studies, and sexuality studies. The course is structured as an intersectional investigation of how gender impacts and is impacted by social construction. Students will read several classic and modern works of feminist theory alongside current sociological and historical studies of gender.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Show proficiency with the specialized vocabulary and historical contexts of the field of literary studies
    2. Demonstrate an ability to synthesize ideas from primary and/or secondary sources
    3. Evaluate the aesthetic and didactic aspects of a text
  
  •  

    HUMN 210 - World Religions


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): None

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course is an introduction to the world’s major religions: Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Islam, Judaism, and Christianity.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. To introduce and outline the varying histories, beliefs and practices of the great religion systems from around the world
    2. To provide an understanding of how religion affects personal convictions in human thought systems, conduct and behavior
    3. To show how religion leads to an understanding of the human search for the meaning of life and a hope in death
    4. To illuminate religious prejudice and the effect it has on our world, providing an open objective forum for safe discussion
    5. To demonstrate that these beliefs, philosophies and sacred writings (and the cultures deriving from them) represent the universal aspirations of all people of good will in some way
  
  •  

    HUMN 241 - History of Western and World Architecture I


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 100  or permission of the instructor

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    The diverse factors that have shaped Western and world architecture from prehistory to the Renaissance are explored through reading, writing, discussion, and special projects.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course: SUNY GE 7: Students will demonstrate knowledge of the conventions and methods of at least one of the humanities in addition to those encompassed by other knowledge areas required by the General Education program.

    Students will be able to:

    1. Show proficiency with the specialized vocabulary, historical context and breadth of the field.
    2. Demonstrate an ability to synthesize ideas from primary and/or secondary sources.
    3. Evaluate the aesthetic and didactic aspects of a text.

    SUNY GE 8: Students will demonstrate understanding of at least one principal form of artistic expression and the creative process inherent therein.

    Students will be able to:

    1. Analyze the elements of art, and principles of design using descriptive writing; and articulate supported interpretations of select works.
    2. Create illustrative graphics in which students effectively utilize the elements of art and principles of design.
    3. Identify select works, architects, and styles/periods in the history of architecture.
    4. Explain major developments in the history of architecture, and how socio-cultural change has affected architects/builders.

  
  •  

    HUMN 242 - History of Western and World Architecture II


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 100  or permission of the instructor

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    The diverse factors that have shaped Western and world architecture from prehistory to the Renaissance are explored through reading, writing, discussion, and special projects. The course begins with an abbreviated presentation of major developments in Western architecture prior to the Renaissance.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course: SUNY GE 7: Students will demonstrate knowledge of the conventions and methods of at least one of the humanities in addition to those encompassed by other knowledge areas required by the General Education program.

    Students will be able to:

    1. Show proficiency with the specialized vocabulary, historical context and breadth of the field.
    2. Demonstrate an ability to synthesize ideas from primary and/or secondary sources.
    3. Evaluate the aesthetic and didactic aspects of a text.

    SUNY GE 8: Students will demonstrate understanding of at least one principal form of artistic expression and the creative process inherent therein.

    Students will be able to:

    1. Analyze the elements of art, and principles of design using descriptive writing; and articulate supported interpretations of select works.
    2. Create illustrative graphics in which students effectively utilize the elements of art and principles of design.
    3. Identify select works, architects, and styles/periods in the history of architecture.
    4. Explain major developments in the history of architecture, and how socio-cultural change has affected architects/builders.

  
  •  

    HUMN 265 - Special Topics in Film


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): HUMN 165  with C- or higher

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course builds on the fundamentals established in HUMN 165  by focusing on a comparatively narrow topic in film theory, history, or genre to be determined by the instructor. 

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. show proficiency with the specialized vocabulary, historical context and breadth of the field (measures the conventions of one area of the humanities);
    2. develop an interpretation and / or argument in response to a text or texts (measures the conventions and methods of one area of the humanities)
  
  •  

    HUMN 296 - Advanced Study in Humanities - lower division


    Credit Hours: 1-4
    Lecture Hours: 1-4
    Laboratory Hours: 1-4

    Prerequisite(s): None

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    The faculty member and student develop an area of study not within an approved course. Advanced study provides a very able and highly motivated student the opportunity to explore a topic of study in greater depth and breadth.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Demonstrate the ability to work independently.
    2. Demonstrate proficiency in the specific area of study.
  
  •  

    HUMN 300 - Ethical Issues in the Criminal Justice System


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): CJUS 100  

    Restriction(s): Criminal Justice BS majors or students requiring an upper-division Liberal Arts elective in their junior and senior years.

    Corequisite(s): None

    Professionals in the Criminal Justice system encounter situations that present specific ethical issues and dilemmas that may test their moral strength. The individuals who work in the system are given great power to do their jobs and to ensure that justice is served. Because of the responsibility criminal justice professionals have and the great injustices that occur when they do not perform their duties in an ethical manner, it is imperative that they are prepared to address the ethical issues they may face, they respect the rule of law, and they respond in an ethical and professional manner. In this course, students will address the difficult ethical issues and dilemmas facing individuals who work in law enforcement, prosecution, the court system, and the correctional system, and help prepare students to face these challenges in a lawful and just manner.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Students will demonstrate their knowledge of the ethical issues and dilemmas facing criminal justice professionals.
    2. Students will critically analyze factual scenarios to resolve the ethical issues and dilemmas facing criminal justice professionals in the most efficient, ethical and just manner.
    3. Students will demonstrate their understanding of the different ethical issues and dilemmas facing individuals who work in in law enforcement, the court system and the correctional system.
    4. Students will demonstrate proficiency in research and writing, including the ability to use criminal justice data regarding ethical issues in criminal justice and incorporate it into their written work.
  
  •  

    HUMN 325 - Nature and Culture


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 100  with a grade of C or better

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course examines the relationship between culture and nature through the humanistic disciplines of art and literature. We will explore theoretical and philosophical perspectives about how humans interact with nature and examine the ways in which culture reflects and shapes our human experiences with nature by looking at cultural products such as landscape painting, nature writing, literature, and cultural mythologies.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Show proficiency with the specialized vocabulary of the field and the significance of relevant historical contexts (measures the conventions of one area of the humanities);
    2. develop an interpretation and / or argument in response to a text or texts (measures the conventions and methods of one area of the humanities).
  
  •  

    HUMN 496 - Advanced Study in Humanities - upper division


    Credit Hours: 1-4
    Lecture Hours: 1-4
    Laboratory Hours: 1-4

    Prerequisite(s): None

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    The faculty member and student develop an area of study not within an approved course. Advanced study provides a very able and highly motivated student the opportunity to explore a topic of study in greater depth and breadth.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Demonstrate the ability to work independently.
    2. Demonstrate proficiency in the specific area of study.

Literature

  
  •  

    LITR 100 - Introduction to Literature


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): None

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course is a survey of basic concepts in literature (including basic elements of fiction) as these are integrated in various genres, including the novel, the play, the short story, and the poem.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course: Students will:

    1. Show proficiency with the specialized vocabulary, historical context, and breadth of the field of literary studies;
    2. Demonstrate an ability to synthesize ideas from primary and/or secondary sources;
    3. Develop an interpretation and/or argument in response to a text or texts.
  
  •  

    LITR 105 - Themes in Literature


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): None

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course introduces students to the principles of literary interpretation and analysis. The class will focus on a guiding theme or topic to be chosen by instructor.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Show proficiency with the specialized vocabulary of the field and the significance of relevant historical contexts
    2. Develop an interpretation and/or argument in response to a text or texts
  
  •  

    LITR 110 - Introduction to Fiction


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): None

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course gives students the opportunity to study several works of fiction by major authors. The primary focus is on elements of fiction, literary styles, and recurrent themes.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course: This course also meets general education requirements for the humanities. As such, it should accomplish the following learning outcomes. Students will:

    1. Show proficiency with the specialized vocabulary of the field;
    2. Demonstrate their understanding of the significance of relevant historical contexts;
    3. Develop an interpretation and/or argument in response to a text or texts.
  
  •  

    LITR 120 - Introduction to Film


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): None

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course surveys the basic concepts, forms, and techniques of the fiction film and presents a brief history of the classic narrative Hollywood film.

  
  •  

    LITR 200 - American Literature I


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 100  or ENGL 200  

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course surveys American literature from the Colonial Period to 1860. The focus is on major authors and historical movements with attention to recurrent themes, literary styles, and philosophic problems.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. After reading an assigned work of fiction, the student is expected to state the plot, conflict(s), major characters and theme(s) of the work.  (See NOTE below 2.)
    2. After reading an assigned poem, the student is expected to identify and discuss important elements of style, figurative language, prosody and theme.

    NOTE:  The student is expected to enter this course with some basic knowledge of the techniques of interpreting fiction and poetry.   Therefore, discussion of these techniques will be kept to a minimum.  Any student who has difficulty reading and/or understanding the assigned selections is expected to seek additional help from the instructor.

    After reading an assigned selection, and hearing lecture and discussion about it, the student is expected to:

    1. analyze the structure of the work, showing the relation of any significant part to any other part and to the whole work;
    2. compare and contrast the work with others by the same author, showing similarities and differences in the use of language, underlying attitude of the author, and theme;
    3. compare and contrast the work with works by other authors, showing those relationships among authors and works which would place them in the same literary period;
    4. identify and describe those theses and underlying attitudes which reflect one or more of the major areas of social, philosophical or ethical concern which recur throughout American literature prior to the Civil War.

  
  •  

    LITR 215 - American Literature II


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 100  or ENGL 200  

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course surveys American literature from 1860 to the present. As in LITR 200 , the focus is on major authors and historical movements with attention to recurrent themes, literary styles, and philosophic problems.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. After reading an assigned work of fiction, the student is expected to state the plot, conflict(s), major characters and theme(s) of the work. (See NOTE below 2.)
    2. After reading an assigned poem, the student is expected to identify and discuss important elements of style, figurative language, prosody and theme.

    NOTE: The student is expected to enter this course with some basic knowledge of the techniques of interpreting fiction and poetry. Therefore discussion of these techniques will be kept to a necessary minimum. Any student who has difficulty reading and/or understanding the assigned selections is expected to seek additional help from the instructor.

    After reading an assigned selection, and hearing lecture and discussion about it, the student is expected to:

    1. analyze the structure of the work, showing the relation of any significant part to any other part and to the whole work;
    2. compare and contrast the work with others by the same author, showing similarities and differences in the use of language, underlying attitude of the author, and theme;
    3. compare and contrast the work with works by other authors, showing those relationships among authors and works which would place them in the same literary period;
    4. identify and describe those theses and underlying attitudes which reflect one or more of the major areas of social, philosophical or ethical concern which recur throughout American literature after the Civil War, and during the 20th century.

  
  •  

    LITR 220 - British Literature I


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 100  or ENGL 200  

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course surveys British literature from the Anglo-Saxon period to 1800. The focus is on major authors and historical movements with attention to recurrent themes, literary styles, and philosophic problems.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course: Students will demonstrate:

    1. knowledge of the conventions and methods of at least one of the humanities in addition to those encompassed by other knowledge areas required by the General Education program
  
  •  

    LITR 225 - British Literature II


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 100  or ENGL 200  

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course surveys British literature from 1800 to the present. As in LITR 220 , the focus is on major authors and historical movements with attention to recurrent themes, literary styles, and philosophic problems.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course: Students will demonstrate:

    1. knowledge of the conventions and methods of at least one of the humanities in addition to those encompassed by other knowledge areas required by the General Education program
  
  •  

    LITR 240 - Shakespeare


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 100  or ENGL 200  

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course is a study of representative Shakespearean drama, with emphasis on its universality and its reflection of literary tradition. Attention is given to the Elizabethan world view and history as they reflect and reveal the playwright and his text.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course: Students will:

    1. show proficiency with the specialized vocabulary of the field and the significance of relevant historical contexts (measures the conventions of one area of the humanities);
    2. develop an interpretation and / or argument in response to a text or texts (measures the conventions and methods of one area of the humanities)
  
  •  

    LITR 250 - Introduction to Poetry


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 100  or ENGL 200 

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course enhances students’ understanding, appreciation, and enjoyment of poetry as a literary form. Emphasis is placed on the nature of poetic language, including figurative language, musical devices, rhythm, meter, and form. Students practice close reading techniques on a variety of traditional and contemporary poems.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Show proficiency with the specialized vocabulary, historical context, and breadth of the field of literary studies;
    2. Demonstrate an ability to synthesize ideas from primary and/or secondary sources;
    3. Develop an interpretation and/or argument in response to a text or texts.
  
  •  

    LITR 260 - Introduction to Drama


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 100  or ENGL 200 

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course introduces students to drama from ancient Greece to contemporary America. Students study the basic forms and techniques of the dramatist, and consider the influence of drama on the fine arts.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Show proficiency with the specialized vocabulary, historical context, and breadth of the field of literary studies;
    2. Demonstrate an ability to synthesize ideas from primary and/or secondary sources;
    3. Develop an interpretation and/or argument in response to a text or texts.
  
  •  

    LITR 270 - Bible as Literature


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): None

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course is a survey of the literature of the Bible, with an examination of major biblical genres: etiology, historical narrative, prophecy, poetry, epistle, etc. Emphasis is on close-reading of biblical texts in light of historical context, modern biblical scholarship, and literary criticism.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course: Students will

    1. show proficiency with the specialized vocabulary of the field and the significance of relevant historical contexts (measures the conventions of one area of the humanities);
    2. develop an interpretation and / or argument in response to a text or texts (measures the conventions and methods of one area of the humanities).
  
  •  

    LITR 296 - Advanced Study in Literature - lower division


    Credit Hours: 1-4
    Lecture Hours: 1-4
    Laboratory Hours: 1-4

    Prerequisite(s): None

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    The faculty member and student develop an area of study not within an approved course. Advanced study provides a very able and highly motivated student the opportunity to explore a topic of study in greater depth and breadth.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Demonstrate the ability to work independently.
    2. Demonstrate proficiency in the specific area of study.
  
  •  

    LITR 310 - Great Writers


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 100  or ENGL 200  and a literature class

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course examines the great writers in literature. Each section will focus on only one writer and provide a comprehensive survey of the writer’s significant texts along with in-depth biographical and contextual information and an overview of secondary critical material. LITR 310 may be taken more than once for degree credit.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course: Students will:

    1. Show proficiency with the specialized vocabulary, historical context, and breadth of the field of literary studies;
    2. Demonstrate an ability to synthesize ideas from primary and/or secondary sources;
    3. Develop an interpretation and/or argument in response to a text or texts.
  
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    LITR 315 - Special Topics in Literature


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 100  or ENGL 200  and any LITR course

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    The course focuses on a comparatively narrow topic in literature that will change from semester to semester.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Show proficiency with the specialized vocabulary, historical context and breadth of the field (measures the conventions of one area of the humanities);
    2. develop an interpretation and / or argument in response to a text or texts (measures the conventions and methods of one area of the humanities).
  
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    LITR 320 - Environmental Literature


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 100  

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course examines the ways in which literature represents the environments around us. We will explore theoretical and philosophical perspectives about how humans perceive and relate to nature and the environment. We will examine a variety of texts (including fiction, poetry, and non-fiction) through an ecocriticism framework.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Students will demonstrate knowledge of the conventions and methods of at least one of the humanities in addition to those encompassed by other knowledge areas required by the General Education program.
  
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    LITR 496 - Advanced Study in Literature - upper division


    Credit Hours: 1-4
    Lecture Hours: 1-4
    Laboratory Hours: 1-4

    Prerequisite(s): None

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    The faculty member and student develop an area of study not within an approved course. Advanced study provides a very able and highly motivated student the opportunity to explore a topic of study in greater depth and breadth.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Demonstrate the ability to work independently.
    2. Demonstrate proficiency in the specific area of study.

Masonry

  
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    MASN 110 - Masonry Fundamentals


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): None

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This lecture course introduces students to the construction techniques and technical data that are involved with residential and light commercial construction. Course content includes theory on masonry materials, footings and formed concrete foundation walls, concrete steps, sidewalks, concrete floors, and fundamentals of brick and block masonry.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. students will demonstrate familiarity with the construction techniques and technical data that are involved with residential and light commercial construction.
    2. Students will be able to identify various masonry materials and their applications
    3. Students will be able to evaluate and plan for masonry projects
  
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    MASN 150 - Finish Masonry


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): MASN 110  

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This lecture course covers the construction theory and technical data related to stone masonry, chimneys and fireplaces, ornamental brickwork, and tile.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Students will be able to demonstrate their understanding of construction practices of various masonry techniques
    2. Students will be able to identify masonry materials and the processes by which they are manufactured
    3. Students will be able to evaluate and plan a masonry project
  
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    MASN 160 - Finish Masonry Lab


    Credit Hours: 4
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Laboratory Hours: 12

    Prerequisite(s): MASN 110  

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This lecture course covers the construction theory and technical data related to stone masonry, chimneys and fireplaces, ornamental brickwork, and tile.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Students will demonstrate skills in various facets of masonry thru both in house and field projects.
    2. Students will demonstrate a focus on problem solving, hand skills, and building techniques to solve on- site construction variables in a real-world working job site project.
  
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    MASN 170 - Foundation Design


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): None

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This lecture course studies the various foundation systems available to the modern contractor. Students develop an understanding of soils and site development. The design, building techniques, and structural details are covered for each foundation type, and students then apply this information to compare each system. Septic systems, radon, and repair of faulty foundations are included.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Students will be able to identify soil types and express the importance of proper site development
    2. Students will become familiar with various design, building techniques and structural details of different foundation types and demonstrate their understanding of advantages or disadvantages of the various systems in given situations.
 

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