2021 - 2022 College Catalog 
    
    Dec 07, 2021  
2021 - 2022 College Catalog

Course Descriptions


 

Other Courses

  
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    LASC 290 - Capstone: Contemporary Issues


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): None

    Restriction(s): Restricted to students in majors 93, 94, 95, & 96 with more than 30 credits (sophomore status)

    Corequisite(s): None

    This is a Liberal Arts and Sciences capstone course. Students will address and analyze a contemporary issue through the multidisciplinary lenses of the humanities, social sciences, natural sciences, and mathematics. The topic of this course will vary.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1.  Explain ideas to others effectively.
    2.  Apply quantitative and scientific methods to solve problems.
    3.  Apply critical thinking methods to solve problems.
    4.  Demonstrate theoretical understandings of social and cultural systems.
    5.  Illustrate the personal and societal relevance of their college coursework.
       

Accounting

  
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    ACCT 115 - Financial Accounting


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): None

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    Basic accounting concepts and principles are introduced. Preparation of financial statements and maintenance of accounting records through the accounting cycle are emphasized. Inventory evaluation; principles of internal control; accounting for the acquisition, depreciation, and disposal of fixed assets; and current liabilities, including an overview of payroll procedures, are included.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Prepare financial statements manually in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP).
    2. Record accounting transactions associated with the accounting cycle - transactional, adjusting, and closing entries.
    3. Calculate and record accounting transactions relevant to inventory and merchandising businesses.
    4. Calculate and record depreciation and gains & losses on the disposal of fixed assets.
  
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    ACCT 125 - Managerial Accounting


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 115  

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    A continuation of the basic accounting principles, course topics include the nature of corporations and related equity and income reporting issues, long-term liabilities, statement of cash flow, nature and behavior of manufacturing cost, introduction to cost accounting concepts and systems, cost-volume-profit relationships, and an introduction to budgetary planning.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Prepare entries to record transactions relating to the corporation
    2. Prepare entries to record transactions relating to long term liabilities
    3. Prepare a cash flow statement
    4. Record transactions, calculate job costs and budgets using the concepts of cost and managerial accounting.
    5. Calculate the cost of manufacturing jobs using job order processing, process costing and activity based systems.
    6. Prepare budgets associated with manufacturing accounting
  
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    ACCT 150 - Accounting for Small Business


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): None

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course considers the accounting and reporting aspects which apply to the operation of a small business. Material covered includes those topics that a business owner needs to know in order to maintain records and control over the different components of his/her business.

  
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    ACCT 210 - Intermediate Accounting I


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): Grade of C or better in ACCT 125  

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course is designed for students who wish to pursue accounting beyond the introductory level. After a review of basic accounting procedures, we shall focus on intermediate accounting theory including measuring and reporting accounting income, analysis of working capital, receivables, inventory cost and valuation procedures, current liabilities and investments.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Demonstrate the ability to perform proper transactional journal entries, adjusting entries and closing entries in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP).
    2. Prepare financial statements using appropriate formats, methods, classifications, and in accordance with GAAP.
    3. Calculate and record the appropriate valuation of cash, receivables and payables; including the resultant impact on revenue and expense accounts.
    4. Calculate and record the value of inventory under the different methods and systems and determine the resultant impact on the various financial statements.
  
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    ACCT 220 - Intermediate Accounting II


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): Grade of C or better in ACCT 210  

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    A continuation of intermediate accounting, topics include plant and equipment (acquisition, depreciation, revaluations), intangibles, long-term liabilities, stock holders’ equity (paid-in capital, retained earnings), and analytical processes (comparative data, special ratios and measurements, errors and their correction, and price level changes).

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Calculate and record the accounting treatment and financial statement impact of obligations associated with employee payroll.
    2. Calculate and record the accounting treatment and financial statement impact of leased assets and obligations.
    3. Calculate and record the accounting treatment and financial statement impact of leased assets and obligations.
    4. Calculate and record the accounting treatment and financial statement impact of the issuance and purchase of bonds and notes payable.
    5. Calculate and record the accounting treatment and financial statement impact of stockholders’ equity transactions.
  
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    ACCT 245 - Computerized Accounting


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 125  and CITA 110  

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    Students will be taken through the complete accounting cycle from the beginning (purchases, sales, and other basic transactions, recording invoices, payments, etc.) to the final work product (a complete set of financial statements) using computerized accounting package. Students will gain an understanding of the patterns of flow of computerized accounting data and information in a business to include computerized general ledger, subsidiary ledgers and payroll applications.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:  

    In a computerized accounting software program:

    1. Set up service and retail companies
    2. Produce financial statements .
    3. Analyze accounts, journalize transactions, prepare adjusting and closing entries
    4. Prepare accounting transactions relevant to accounts receivables and payables, inventory, payroll, cash receipts and disbursements

  
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    ACCT 250 - Federal Income Tax


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 125  

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course covers Federal Income Tax Law, its applications to individual taxpayers and practice in preparing tax returns. Topics include: introduction to the history of tax; rates and exemptions; income determination; recognition of gains and losses; deductions; tax planning and an introduction to estate and gift taxes.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Identify and differentiate appropriate tax filing status and dependencies.
    2. Identify, differentiate and record different types of income using the appropriate tax form(s).
    3. Identify, differentiate and record different types of adjustments using the appropriate tax form(s).
    4. Identify, differentiate and record different types of deductions using the appropriate tax form(s).
    5. Identify, differentiate and record different types of credits using the appropriate tax form(s).
    6. Completion of an actual taxpayer’s tax return.
  
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    ACCT 310 - Accounting Information Systems


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): Grade of C or better in ACCT 125  or permission of the instructor

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course is designed to study elements of accounting information systems. Conceptual modeling, implementation of accounting transaction processing systems, enterprise value chains, business processes, documentations, and control requirements are emphasized.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Analyze business processes and design and ascertain that accounting systems contain the proper controls and risk protection measures.
    2. Trace accounting systems move from traditional general ledger systems to resource planning systems.
    3. Design accounting systems using database management software and data flow diagrams.
    4. Design system flowcharts to map out specific accounting functions.
    5. Identify internal control issues such as proper usage of passwords and other access controls and the importance of systematic controls
  
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    ACCT 320 - Advanced Accounting


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): C- or better in ACCT 220 

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course covers accounting issues relating to business combinations and the preparation and reporting of consolidated financial statements; translating foreign currency transactions and operations; and partnership accounting.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Apply the appropriate accounting and financial reporting rules for intercorporate acquisitions and investments in business entities
    2. Prepare journal entries for the equity method of accounting for intercorporate acquisitions.
    3. Apply the appropriate accounting and financial reporting rules for the consolidation of a less-than and wholly-owned subsidiaries.
    4. Prepare consolidated financial statements, including journal entries for intercompany transactions.
    5. Account for foreign currency transactions and the translation of foreign currency financial statements.
    6. Apply the accounting and the financial reporting rules for the formation, operation, and liquidation of partnerships.

     

  
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    ACCT 350 - Federal Income Tax


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 125  or ACCT 210  

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course covers Federal Income Tax Law, its applications to individual taxpayers and practice in preparing tax returns. Topics include: introduction to the history of tax; rates and exemptions; income determination; recognition of gains and losses; deductions; tax planning and an introduction to estate and gift taxes.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Identify and differentiate appropriate tax filing status and dependencies.
    2. Identify, differentiate and record different types of income using the appropriate tax form(s).
    3. Identify, differentiate and record different types of adjustments using the appropriate tax form(s).
    4. Identify, differentiate and record different types of deductions using the appropriate tax form(s).
    5. Identify, differentiate and record different types of credits using the appropriate tax form(s).
    6. Completion of an actual taxpayer’s tax return.
    7. Completion of a capstone project
  
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    ACCT 400 - Auditing Class


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): Grade of C or better in ACCT 220  or permission of the instructor

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course is designed to provide the student with a basic understanding of all aspects of auditing. These include accepting and planning the audit, evaluating internal controls, verifying account balances and financial statement assertions, reporting on audited financial statements, as well as auditing standards, and the legal liabilities and professional and personal ethical responsibilities of auditors.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Define and display the proper usage of audit specific terminology.
    2. Demonstrate proper audit techniques for each of the significant balance sheet areas.
    3. Differentiate between different types of assurance services and their appropriate usage.
    4. Assess the different types of risk, identify weaknesses in internal control, and offer suggestions for remediation.
    5. Select and perform appropriate audit procedures for major auditable areas
  
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    ACCT 410 - Information Systems Audit and Control


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 310  with C- or better or Permission of Instructor

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course is designed as the capstone course to the Information Systems Auditing curriculum. This will include topics covering but not limited to: Standards & Guidelines for IS Auditing, Internal Control Concepts, IT Audit Planning Process, IT Audit Management, Audit Evidence Process, Support Tools & Frameworks, Technical Infrastructure and Service Center Management.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Students will be able to identify auditing standards, auditing ethics, certification boards and examinations associated with the auditing profession.
    2. Students will be able to identify the PDC model of controls as well as identify specific controls associated with each type as well as identify the auditing standards associated with evidence.
    3. Students will be able to identify the components of the audit approach under the CobiT model
    4. Students will be able to identify the role of management and proper IT governance in mitigating risk.
    5. Students will be able to identify risks and controls associated with the major IT auditing categories.
    6. Students will be able to demonstrate usage of a CAAT to complete an audit case study.
    7. Students will be able to identify appropriate audit procedures to plan and execute a proper IS audit

Architectural Engineering Construction Technology

  
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    AECT 100 - Architecture & Construction Orientation


    Credit Hours: 1
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): None

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course is an introduction to architectural and construction technology as fields of study and careers. Topics include a review of academic policies and requirements for successful completion of the program, and a review of techniques, procedures, and systems in architecture and construction. The course explores career opportunities in residential, commercial, and industrial industries, and students will investigate areas of continued study at the upper-division level, i.e., transfer. The use of spreadsheets (Microsoft Excel) will also be covered.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:  

    1. Understand the role of the Architect & Construction Manager in Residential, Commercial, Heavy, and Industrial construction projects.

    2. Interpret Plans and Specifications for construction projects.

    3. Define basic terminology of the construction industry, building codes, agencies, and organizations.

    4. Demonstrate fundamental math principles such as units, dimensioning, and conversions.

    5. Compare computer software and resources for construction related problem solving.

  
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    AECT 110 - Construction Materials


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): None

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course gives students an overview of the many construction materials available in the industry today. This is an introductory course in the physical properties, design considerations, and practical applications of engineered structural components and common finish materials as they relate to the entire building system. Typical manufacturing processes and product standards are also discussed.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Students will witness soil lab experiments and analyze the data. Team Based Learning will be used. Actual testing done in CNST 150 .
    2. Students will witness concrete testing experiments and analyze the data. Students will work in groups to analyze actual concrete plans & specs. Team Based Learning will be used. Actual testing & mock-up done in CNST 150 .
    3. Students will witness masonry testing experiments and analyze the data. Students will work in groups to analyze actual masonry plans & specs. Team Based Learning will be used. Actual testing & mock-up done in CNST 150 .
    4. Students will work in groups to analyze actual steel plans & specs. Team Based Learning will be used. Actual testing & mock-up done in CNST 210 .
    5. Students will view and accurately identify wood products and/or graphic representations and accurately answer questions as to how they are used in the building industry when exposed to various conditions.
    6. Students will view products and/or graphic representations, and accurately identify the products by sight, as well as determine the best uses and limitations of when exposed to varying conditions.
    7. Students will identify various adhesives and sealants, as well as determine the best uses and limitations of these products when exposed to varying conditions. Students will be able to accurately compare and contrast advantages/disadvantages of using the various products.
  
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    AECT 150 - Statics & Strengths of Materials


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Laboratory Hours: 2

    Prerequisite(s): MATH 128  or higher

    Restriction(s):  

    Restricted to students in the following programs:

    Construction Technology - AAS  

    Construction Management: Design and Building - BT  

    Architectural Technology - AAS  

    Architectural Design and Building - BT  

    Construction Technology - BT

    Mechatronics Technology - BT  

    Mechatronics Design - AAS  

    Carpentry - AAS

    Mechatronics Technology - AOS

    Carpentry and Building Trades - AOS

    Residential Construction - AAS  

    Corequisite(s): None

    Selected topics include: analysis of basic forces, conditions for equilibrium, truss analysis, stress-strain relationships, riveted and bolted connections, investigation of simple beams by shear and moment diagrams, steel and timber beam analysis and design, and simple column analysis and design.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:  

    1. ACCE CT SLO #12 (CT.SLO.12) - Understand the basic principles of structural design
    **This is required by our accrediting body ACCE and can not be changed**
    2. Recognize the properties of different materials and integrate this into structural analysis.
    3. Demonstrate knowledge of load tracing for residential, commercial, and heavy construction projects.
    4. Identify applicable codes, test procedures, and specifications relating to structural design.
    5. Describe the structural engineer’s role in the design and construction process.

  
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    AECT 250 - Struc. Steel & Reinf. Concrete


    Credit Hours: 4
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 2

    Prerequisite(s): AECT 210

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    Structural steel framing design using LRFD and design of reinforced concrete members using ACI-318 code are analyzed. Computer applications and a comprehensive design project of steel and concrete framed buildings are required.

  
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    AECT 280 - Mechanical, Electrical, and Plumbing


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Laboratory Hours: 3

    Prerequisite(s): None

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course presents the fundamentals of mechanical and electrical equipment requirements for buildings. Topics include design of water supply and sanitary systems; environmental comfort (heat loss, heat gain, temperature and humidity); principles of warm air, steam, hot-water, radiant-panel and electrical heating systems; air- conditioning systems; planning and layout of warm-air and air-conditioning sheet metal and hot-water heating piping for residential and commercial building; alternate energy systems both active and passive; basic design and installation of residential electrical circuits; symbols and electrical theory; and basic code elements.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Students will learn mechanical, electrical and plumbing symbols and drawing identifications, through lecture, textbook reading assignments, and during interactive lab sessions.
    2. Students will learn mechanical, electrical and plumbing system components through lecture, textbook reading assignments, and during interactive lab sessions.
    3. Students will demonstrate their knowledge of mechanical, electrical and plumbing systems through effectively reading blueprints and sketching various systems and components.
    4. Students will demonstrate their knowledge of mechanical, electrical and plumbing systems through effectively reading blueprints and sketching various systems and components.
    5. Students will express an understanding of codes when evaluating the design of plumbing systems.
  
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    AECT 300 - Design-Build Management


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Laboratory Hours: 3

    Prerequisite(s): AECT 400  

    Restriction(s): Junior/Senior level and Construction Mgmt: Design&Build or Construction Management BT majors only

    Corequisite(s): None

    The fundamentals of design-build projects and delivery systems are introduced. Methods of partnering/joint venturing for design-build developments are also reviewed in detail. Students will learn how an organization can be structured to efficiently manage a team design-build approach. Processes that involve both design and construction parties, such as; RFIs, Submittals, Quality Control (QC) Reports, Issuance Of Draft/Construction & Final (As-Built) Design Documents, Pre-Construction Planning, Activity Status Reporting, Project Closeout, and other related topics are included. Team management approaches, procedures and policies, and operations are also presented.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Students will learn and research The Design Build Method and be able to implement its practices.
    2. Students will work together on projects from the initial stages through completion.
    3. Students will work on projects where use of these objectives will be integrated in semester field projects.
    4. Students will successfully manage construction activities in a secondary lab setting.
    5. Students will demonstrate an understanding of excellence of quality construction through their projects and studies.
  
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    AECT 301 - Construction Mgt Competition


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): Permission of Instructor required.

    Restriction(s): Restricted to Construction and/or Architecture majors.

    Corequisite(s): None

    Students will expand on previous coursework to develop professional construction management proposals, presentations, scheduling and estimating. Proposals, presentations, schedules and estimates will be built based on real-life construction projects and scenarios. Students will expand their management skills, develop and implement documentation to be used in annual regional and national construction management competitions. All students will participate in a team and compete in an annual regional and/or national construction management competition.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Research and develop proper construction management proposals.
    2. Research and develop proper construction management proposal presentations.
    3. Develop proper documentation in accordance with annual request for proposals given by competition judges prior to competition.
    4. Demonstrate competency in annual regional/national competitions.
  
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    AECT 310 - Residential Building Systems II


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): None

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course is designed to give the student a broader based understanding of residential framing and building principles learned up to this point. Topics include mathematical aspects of framing problems, principles of truss constructions, specific “real life” framing examples, residential framing member sizing, sustainable construction techniques and alternative construction methods.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Students will accurately solve various building problems utilizing mathematical concepts.
    2. Given a plan, the student will correctly calculate various rafter lengths, ridge lengths and ridge post heights.
    3. Students will accurately identify methods to minimize lumber usage without compromising structural integrity.
    4. Students will demonstrate understanding of the design and function of basic trusses.
    5. Students will view case studies and /or blueprints and be able to accurately answer questions related to building construction.
    6. Students will research and report on a residential construction technique that is considered to be non-standard.
  
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    AECT 320 - Mechanical Systems & Balancing


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): AECT 280  

    Restriction(s): Junior or higher class level

    Corequisite(s): None

    Efficient operation of a building’s mechanical systems/components, and the balancing of HVAC loads for the comfort of the occupants, are key components of this course. Students will be exposed to testing and diagnostic equipment/processes commonly used in industry today. Additionally, trouble shooting, preventative maintenance, energy efficiency, potable water systems and emergency issues will be studied. Cross listed with FMGT 320 .

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. The student will perform necessary calculations to identify associated costs and savings of various mechanical systems
    2. The student will accurately describe techniques to remedy various load balancing problems
    3. The student will demonstrate proficiency by flowcharting solutions to various problems involving maintenance and trouble-shooting
    4. Students will accurately describe methods of resolving potential emergency problems as they relate to a facility’s mechanical systems
  
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    AECT 330 - Residential Millwork


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Laboratory Hours: 4

    Prerequisite(s): CNST 110 

    Restriction(s): Junior status; Construction Management BT major

    Corequisite(s): None

    The more advanced areas of finish carpentry are studied. Practices of complicated interior trim, advanced stair construction and hand-rail systems, as well as a variety of other millwork applications are covered. The course includes some laboratory exercises applying these skills.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Students will layout specific geometric shapes using a compass and straightedge to tolerances as required by the instructor.
    2. Students will accurately identify, by sight, various common moldings.
    3. Students will demonstrate the ability to cut and fit common moldings to fit with tolerances dictated by the instructor.
    4. Students will accurately identify stair and balustrade components, calculate stairs to within specific tolerances as required by the instructor.
    5. Students will accurately identify components porch construction and demonstrate knowledge of design as it relates to air movement and decay as well as proper material selection.
    6. Students will demonstrate the ability to create a custom cornice or layered molding project by layering moldings. Students will be required to build the perform to specific tolerances.
    7. Students will be required to demonstrate knowledge of producing curved moldings using a variety of techniques. Moldings will be required to be manufactured to specific tolerances.
    8. Students will accurately identify several of the more common types of architecture as required by the instructor.
    9. Students will demonstrate the ability to perform an in-depth research project as directed by the instructor such as:
      1. Residential millwork applications to a commercial building frame
      2. Design (profiles, detail drawings, material type, etc.) estimate and plan millwork for a comprehensive project, this may involve execution of a project.
      3. Historical preservation/restoration
  
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    AECT 340 - Estimating and Planning II


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CNST 260 , AECT 110 , CNST 110 , CNST 150  or CNST 210 , and MATH 128  or higher level

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course is a continuation of CNST 260 - Estimating and Planning I . The course will delve into advanced fundamentals of construction estimating and planning. An in depth look into real life commercial, industrial, residential, and heavy civil projects for reference. Topics including but not limited to: bidding, evaluation of subcontracts, budgeting, square footage costs, quantity take off, advanced labor and work crew estimations, CPM scheduling, resource loading, updating and tasking of construction schedules. A study of Lean construction and project integration of Lean. Personal computer usage in spreadsheets, time management software and estimating software will be an integral part of the course.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Students will research and use different types of estimating & planning software in all areas of construction.
    2. Students will use real drawings to determine proper quantity take off in all areas of construction.
    3. Students will research the process in which the construction process is scheduled with work crews and labor forces.
    4. Students will learn and be able to develop in depth schedules including cost loading and labor linkage.
  
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    AECT 360 - Structural Theory


    Credit Hours: 4
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 3

    Prerequisite(s): AECT 150  and ARCH 110  

    Restriction(s): Junior and Senior level. Construction Mgmt:Design&Build, Architectural Design & Bldg, and Construction Management BT majors only.

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course covers the application of forces for analysis and design of building structures. Included are load analysis for wind and seismic conditions. Analysis of building structural systems including lateral force resisting systems, frames, arches, and trusses is also covered. Students are exposed to basic design in timber, steel, masonry, and concrete. A research project and computer applications are integrated into the course.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:  

    1. Understand the fundamental principles of Structural Engineering.

    2. Analyze and determine any of the various types of loads typically applied to building structures, including live, dead, wind, snow and seismic.

    3. Analyze and calculate structural components of buildings using wood, concrete, masonry and steel framing members. Usage of various computer software and Internet research.

    4. Identify structural design provisions from various Building Codes.

  
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    AECT 370 - Site Engineering


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 3

    Prerequisite(s): None

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course focuses on engineering methods and strategies applied to shaping the earth’s surface to accommodate buildings and associated construction. The course is presented in both lecture and studio format. Theory presented in lecture will be applied to the graphic solution of site engineering problems in the studio.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Read and graphically express landforms.
    2. Use surveying tools to collect data and create a topographic base map.
    3. Discuss how soils relate to construction and drainage.
    4. Use computer software to express and visualize existing conditions and design proposals.
    5. Perform basic storm water management calculations and
    6. Apply storm water best management practices.
    7. Understand road alignment principles.
    8. Create a basic site layout plan.
    9. Apply knowledge from the above topics to create creative grading design solutions.
    10. Understanding equipment selection and production rates
    11. Review crane types and operation
  
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    AECT 375 - Facilities Systems & Process Piping


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): None

    Restriction(s): Junior or Senior level. Construction Mgmt: Design&Build, Architectural Design & Bldg, Construction Management BT, Mechatronics BT (5AB) major only.

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course presents advanced design and installation concepts for process piping and mechanical systems required for industrial and manufacturing construction applications. Topics include detailed descriptions of piping material typically found in industrial applications, why these materials are used in their applications, design considerations including thermal expansion, structural supports, ideal velocities, corrosion characteristics and other installation requirements. Also included will be process exhaust abatement systems and other large scale process systems found in several industrial and manufacturing applications.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Students will learn characteristics of various materials used in process piping applications including corrosion, expansion, joining methods, and quality control through lectures, textbook reading assignment and handouts.
    2. Students will learn about piping applications for various systems including chemical, process drains, process gas, high-purity water, drinking water, etc. through lectures, textbook reading assignments and handouts.
    3. Students will identify installation requirements including support, expansion loops, valves, heat trace and insulation through lectures, textbook readying assignments and handouts
    4. Students will learn about process acid, base and solvent exhaust abatement systems, DI water, chemical and gas equipment through lectures, textbook reading assignments and handouts.
    5. Students will identify various quality control requirements for high purity, drinking water, clean for oxygen service, including documentation, texting requirements, etc. through lectures, textbook reading assignments and handouts.
  
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    AECT 380 - Career Seminar


    Credit Hours: 1
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Laboratory Hours: 2

    Prerequisite(s): None

    Restriction(s): Junior or Senior level. Construction Mgmt:Design&Build, Construction Management BT majors only

    Corequisite(s): None

    An internship experience is necessary to complete the degree requirements in the Construction Management Option. This course prepares students for the internship and assists them towards securing appropriate employment. The development of professional resumes, cover letters, and other related communication skills are covered in detail. In addition, students will learn how to research prospective employers that match their particular career interests.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Students will learn what is required and expected to complete the internship including the required forms, recording time worked, binder preparation, and evaluations.
    2. Students will learn how to build technical resumes and cover letters and e-portfolios what employers look for when reviewing these documents and how to avoid common mistakes.
    3. Students will research and track progress for potential employment opportunities.
    4. Students will develop interview communication skills, proper attire, common questions and techniques, and how to avoid common mistakes.
  
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    AECT 390 - CM Internship I


    Credit Hours: 12
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): AECT 380 

    Restriction(s): Junior or Senior level

    Corequisite(s): None

    This is the required internship phase of the Construction Management Degree Option. Students receive on-the-job construction experience in many facets of the workplace. Each student’s comprehension of how actual building projects are effectively developed will be significantly enhanced. In addition, interns will be introduced to numerous construction practices and methods that are commonplace within the industry.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course: In order to ensure that students are offered a true learning experience during their internships, students must encounter at least one hundred hours of duties/responsibilities within four of the below CM Silos.

    1. Field Supervision
    2. Estimating & Cost Control
    3. Scheduling & Planning
    4. Surveying / Site Layout
    5. Hands-On Building Experience
    6. Project Engineering (Project Or Plan Review/Analysis)
    7. Documentation (Field Reports, Submittals, Drawings, Specifications, Etc.)
    8. Procurement Of Materials, Subcontractors, And/Or Labor
  
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    AECT 395 - CM Internship II


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): AECT 380  

    Restriction(s): Junior or Senior level

    Corequisite(s): None

    This is the required internship phase of the Construction Management Degree Option. Students receive on-the-job construction experience in many facets of the workplace. Each student’s comprehension of how actual building projects are effectively developed will be significantly enhanced. In addition, interns will be introduced to numerous construction practices and methods that are commonplace within the industry.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course: In order to ensure that students are offered a true learning experience during their internships, students must encounter at least one hundred hours of duties/responsibilities within four of the below CM Silos.

    1. Field Supervision
    2. Estimating & Cost Control
    3. Scheduling & Planning
    4. Surveying / Site Layout
    5. Hands-On Building Experience
    6. Project Engineering (Project Or Plan Review/Analysis)
    7. Documentation (Field Reports, Submittals, Drawings, Specifications, Etc.)
    8. Procurement Of Materials, Subcontractors, And/Or Labor
  
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    AECT 400 - Construction Project Management


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Laboratory Hours: 3

    Prerequisite(s): CNST 270 

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    The principles of project management are applied to case studies of actual construction projects. Topics include estimating and bidding, construction site planning, material and equipment procurement, project cost control, scheduling, coordination of subcontractors, along with resource and labor management; including pre-purchasing of materials and “Project Labor Agreement (PLAs),” are covered in detail. In addition, further experience with construction related software is applied throughout the course (MS Project, Prolog, MS Excel, CADD, and other related software).

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Students will research and complete assignments on case studies of projects pertaining to proper and improper use(s) of Project Management
    2. Students will analyze past and present projects and use these real life projects to implement their knowledge on these items.
    3. Students will understand how to implement quality control measures, value engineering, procurement, team organization, project start-up, site planning, cost and schedule control measures, project closeout, and other related topics.
    4. Students will realize business risks associated with performing construction related work and how to successfully manage construction operations to help control this factor.
    5. Students will realistically demonstrate the project management processes that are necessary to successfully complete a complex construction development through the use of construction project management tools & software.
  
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    AECT 410 - Building Codes & Professional Practices


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): Junior standing or permission of the instructor

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course provides a comprehensive overview of the international building code as it applies to building design and construction. Emphasis is placed on the recognition and application of the most common code provisions, particularly those that affect life safety. In addition, the legal basis for, and typical provisions of, local zoning codes are explored.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Students will research and complete assignments on navigating the code, case studies of code issues and projects pertaining to proper and improper use of building codes.
    2. Students will analyze past and present projects and the use of building codes during these projects.
    3. Students will research the variances of codes country to country, state to state, county to county.
    4. Students will research and develop final projects pertaining to their overall knowledge of building codes and zoning.
  
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    AECT 415 - Sustainable Building Practices


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): None

    Restriction(s): Restricted to junior and senior Construction Management and Architecture students

    Corequisite(s): None

    The course is concerned with environmental issues and how they ultimately impact society and building construction methodology. This will be viewed globally, regionally and locally. There will be discussion of general design, based on principles of sustainability, energy efficiency and other environmentally and ecologically friendly construction methods typically found on residential and commercial building sites. Other topics will include the impact of Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED), National Green Building Standard (NGBS), and other “green” organizations have on the building industry today.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Students will discuss environmental matters currently influencing the building industry. This includes correctly identifying the various issues faced in different geographic regions.
    2. Students will demonstrate this knowledge of sustainable building practices within a long-term, small group project (4-5 students) involving in-depth design of a sustainable structure.
    3. Students will view case studies and consider the impact of the site plan on the overall efficiency and sustainability of the structure.
    4. Students will compare various green energy options, advantages and disadvantages depending on the geographic location, site, and other factors.
    5. Students will demonstrate understanding of indoor environmental quality by incorporating these concepts, in a practical manner, into a structures design.
    6. Students will demonstrate understanding of sustainable products used on/within a structure by incorporating the products into a sustainable structure. Accuracy will be determined by the proper use of the components in the given situation.
  
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    AECT 450 - Building Science


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): None

    Restriction(s): Restricted to junior and senior Construction Management and Architecture students

    Corequisite(s): None

    Buildings have become more complex as the effects of energy efficiency and mechanical systems have become more sophisticated. This course examines how all systems in a building interact with each other and how their interaction affects indoor air quality, energy usage and air/moisture migration within the structure. Also examined are the use of diagnostic methods, including blower door test results and FLIR images, to supplement heat-loss data when evaluating the built structure.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Describe the relationship of the three pathways for heat loss through a building section.
    2. Explain methods employed to minimize air infiltration into a building.
    3. Describe pathways and mitigation measures for slowing migration of water into a building.
    4. Contrast the functions of a vapor retarder and an air barrier.
    5. Calculate the overall estimated heat loss and resulting heating cost of building given the appropriate data.
    6. Describe a blower door test and the use of a FLIR camera
  
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    AECT 460 - Structural Steel Design


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): AECT 360  

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course is a study of steel as a material, including analysis and design of steel framed members in building structures in conformance with AISC code. Typical structural components include tension members, compression members, beams, welded and bolted connections, trusses, and frames. Use of computer software to solve problems is included.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:  

    1. Understand the fundamental principles of structural steel design for buildings.

    2. Determine structural steel-framed building systems and components for typical low-rise commercial, industrial, residential, and institutional buildings.

    3. Calculate building components using light-gage cold-formed steel products.

    4. Interpret the A.I.S.C Manual of Steel Construction, latest ed.

  
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    AECT 480 - Reinforced Concrete Design


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): AECT 360  

    Restriction(s): Junior or Senior level. Construction Mgmt:Design&Build, Architectural Design & Bldg, Construction Management BT majors only.

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course is a study of concrete as a material, including analysis and design of concrete framed members in building structures in conformance with ACI-318 code. Typical structural components include flexural members, compression members, one-way and two-way slabs, footings, and walls. Use of computer software to solve problems is included.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Understand basic principles and practices associated with design, analysis and usage of reinforced concrete in buildings and other structures.

    2. Interpret the latest industry standard formulas, tables, design aids and computer software in the economical selection (design) of steel and concrete members.

    3. Develop construction documents using current construction practices and techniques.

  
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    AECT 496 - Advanced Study in Architectural Engineering Construction Technology - upper division


    Credit Hours: 1-4
    Lecture Hours: 1-4
    Laboratory Hours: 1-4

    Prerequisite(s): None

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    The faculty member and student develop an area of study not within an approved course. Advanced study provides a very able and highly motivated student the opportunity to explore a topic of study in greater depth and breadth.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Demonstrate the ability to work independently.
    2. Demonstrate proficiency in the specific area of study.

Allied Health

  
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    ALHT 106 - Culture and Healthcare


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): Current or previous enrollment in NURS 101 

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course introduces the concept of cultural impact on healthcare decisions of individuals, families, and ethnic/ geographical groups of people. The course will examine various cultural healthcare practices, specifically addressing cultural views regarding communication, self, health, illness, childbirth, and the process of dying.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Identify and discuss cultural differences regarding communication, view of self, health, illness, childbirth and dying.   
    2. Examine various cultures and how their unique beliefs of communication, self, health, illness, childbirth, and dying impact healthcare decisions.
  
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    ALHT 202 - Statistics and Research Methods


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): UNIV 300 

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course explores concepts of qualitative & quantitative research and its use in conducting investigations of phenomenon in the social and behavioral sciences. The course will further provide the learner with an understanding of research methodologies and enable the learner to appropriately select statistical techniques to answer research questions. The learner will be introduced to the use of the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS).

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Discuss the importance of statistics to their field of endeavor.
    2. Differentiate between qualitative and quantitative research and basic concepts associated with descriptive statistics.
    3. Calculate, by hand and with SPSS, measures of central tendency, measures of variability, and inferential statistics such as: t-tests, analysis of variance (ANOVA), and simple regression.
    4. Gain an understanding of various types reliability and validity, hypothesis testing and normal curves.
    5. Analyze inferential statistical procedures, nonparametric procedures, and published research for appropriateness of methodology.
  
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    ALHT 300 - Pathophysiology


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): UNIV 300  

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    The concepts of pathophysiology over the lifespan are covered in detail, including etiology and progression of disorders affecting cells (micro), organs (macro), and systems involved in the regulation of structure and function within the human organism. In addition to examining systemic disorders, the influence of genetics/heredity, race, ethnicity, environment, gender and age on physiological health will be explored.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Differentiate between physiologic and pathophysiologic processes
    2. Explore the physiologic basis for manifestations and adaptive responses of disease processes
    3. Integrate concepts of genetics/heredity, race, ethnicity, environment, gender, risk factors, and age with the etiology and pathophysiology of disease processes
  
  •  

    ALHT 301 - Ethics in Healthcare


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): UNIV 300 

    Restriction(s): Restricted to Nursing: Online - RN-to-BSN  and Healthcare Management - BBA  programs

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course focuses on contemporary healthcare issues raising personal and professional ethical concerns. Emphasis is placed on cultural differences, current legislation, political and religious controversy, economic constraints, technology, and professional commitment related to the resolution of the identified ethical dilemmas. The process of ethical analysis and reasoning is used to resolve representative and healthcare situations. Scientific literature that has utility in guiding ethical decision making will be explored and analyzed.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Identify the role of the healthcare professional with regard to ethical decision-making.
    2. Explore theories and principles central to ethical dilemmas and moral development.
    3. Examine how ethical decision-making impacts healthcare professionals.
    4. Analyze research related to ethical issues and dilemmas to promote ethical decision making.
  
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    ALHT 304 - Death and Dying


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): ALHT 202 , MATH 115 , or equivalent statistics course; ENGL 100  and/or ENGL 200 ; PSYC 100  

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course focuses on historical and contemporary perspectives on death and dying. Current American practices and transcultural considerations are addressed. Emphasis is placed on the terminally ill and bereaved and ethical, moral, and legal issues surrounding the care of the dying individual.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Reflect upon the evolution of death, personal concepts of death and evaluate personal preferences for end of life planning
    2. Explore culturally and spiritually sensitive communication by the healthcare worker as it relates to the dying process
    3. Describe interventions that facilitate the grief process specific to the needs and tasks of the dying individual across the lifespan
    4. Identify the role of hospice and palliative care during the dying process and preventive measures for compassion fatigue in caregivers
    5. Critique the different ethical and moral sides of death and dying issues
  
  •  

    ALHT 400 - Epidemiology


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): UNIV 300 , ALHT 202  or MATH 115 , ALHT 300 , ALHT 301 , NURS 300 , NURS 301 , NURS 302 , NURS 303 

    Restriction(s): Restricted to Nursing: Online - RN-to-BSN  and Healthcare Management - BBA  programs

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course presents epidemiological principles and methods with emphasis on the health status and health needs of a population, on levels of prevention, on susceptibility, and modes of transmission; and on promotion of health using various strategies. Statistical measures and findings from research are applied to describe the incidence & prevalence of disease; morbidity and mortality rates; health beliefs and behaviors; socioeconomic, ethnic and racial disparities; causality of disease and disability; and risk factors for the purpose of evidence-based decision making in public health.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Describe the role of epidemiology in public health decision-making.
    2. Apply epidemiological concepts and principles to assessment and management of public health problems.
    3. Analyze statistical data and research for evidenced-based decision making in epidemiology and public health.
    4. Assess disparities and ethical issues in health caused by racial, ethnic, cultural, gender, age, socioeconomic, or environmental factors and their influences on health behaviors and risks in populations.
  
  •  

    ALHT 401 - Health Policy


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): UNIV 300 , ALHT 202  or MATH 115 , ALHT 300 , ALHT 301 , NURS 300 , NURS 301 , NURS 302 , NURS 303  

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course will introduce students to the key concepts of the healthcare policy process. Students will examine the interactions between government, healthcare providers, consumers, and insurers and how they impact policy and programmatic decisions in the workplace and community. Various contemporary healthcare policy topics surrounding the current US healthcare system and systems of other developed nations will be explored such as financing, quality and safety, and services.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Investigate historical events and public policies which have shaped the current healthcare delivery system in the United States.
    2. Compare and contrast the strengths and limitations of the healthcare delivery system.
    3. Analyze economic, social, cultural, natural, and political factors which affect the healthcare delivery system.
    4. Analyze the relationships between local, state, and national health policy and the current healthcare delivery system.
    5. Compare and contrast the healthcare delivery system in the United States with the healthcare delivery system in other selected countries.
  
  •  

    ALHT 500 - Health Policy and Technology in Healthcare


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): Enrolled in the Healthcare Management - BBA  with junior status

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course combines key concepts of health policy development and technology used in healthcare systems. Learners will debate current healthcare reform, examine basic concepts of healthcare informatics and current systems in usage, in order to have a comprehensive look at current healthcare policy issues, efforts to address disparities, and technology used in healthcare. Models for studying vulnerable populations will be integrated into examining strategies for improvement, and will be presented in live webinar format. The use of information technology in healthcare systems is analyzed for improving organizational outcomes and healthcare delivery.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Explore healthcare quality indicators and selected healthcare informatics systems for their influence on policy development and healthcare delivery
    2. Analyze individual, community, and societal determinants of vulnerable populations, healthcare disparities, and current legislative efforts to preserve individual and group rights
    3. Conceptualize the integration of policy development and informatics to enable positive change in healthcare delivery
    4. Integrate the healthcare policy legislative process with informatics concepts to address needs of vulnerable populations.
  
  •  

    ALHT 501 - Leadership and Quality Improvement in Healthcare Systems


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): None

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course provides a foundation of leadership, organizational, change, and quality improvement principles, guided by theories, evidence, benchmarks, and regulatory and professional standards in nursing and healthcare. Learners will apply concepts of organizational complexity, challenges, and opportunities to potential leadership projects and how to be effective change agents in healthcare organizations. Content focuses on applying universal principles of leadership that drive the processes of change, quality improvement, and innovation in healthcare organizations. Strategies for creating a culture of quality and safety are applied through case studies. Concepts include interdisciplinary communication, conflict management, and collective bargaining. There is emphasis on defining, measuring, and evaluating outcomes within organizations and systems through a Quality Improvement Project.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Provide a framework to examine principles, theories, evidence, styles, behaviors, and ethics of leadership in healthcare organizations.
    2. Integrates policies, standards, regulatory practices and benchmarks of quality and safety with leadership of healthcare organizations.
    3. Fosters understanding of organizational, interdisciplinary, and collaborative communication.
    4. Provides opportunity to explore team building, collective bargaining, and negotiating practices.
  
  •  

    ALHT 600 - Building Blocks for Teaching with Technology


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): None

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course introduces learners to the theories, evidence, and models supporting the use of educational technologies and their application in education across healthcare disciplines.  Students will explore concepts associated with e-learning design and delivery and will have opportunities to apply concepts associated with design and delivery of educational material.      

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Examine learning theories foundational to the instructional design process
    2. Identify the steps of various instructional design models
    3. Apply theories and models of instructional design to development of learning activities
    4. Examine the relationship between teaching, digital learning, and the development of metacognition
  
  •  

    ALHT 601 - Technology Tools for Teaching in Healthcare


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): None

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course introduces students to resources that support technology integration in various healthcare learning environments and to technology tools that can be used to engage learners.  Numerous educational technology tools will be introduced, and learners will examine how to use the tools.  In addition, features of the tools will be reviewed, and students will learn to apply tools to project creation. Students will evaluate technology tools using a comprehensive educational technology rubric.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Review resources for educational technology and associated pedagogy
    2. Demonstrate mastery of various educational technology tools
    3. Compare and contrast advantages and disadvantages of selected educational technology tools
    4. Evaluate educational technology tools 
  
  •  

    ALHT 602 - Application of Educational Technology Tools


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): None

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course provides learners with the opportunity to develop technology-based learning modules that are pedagogically sound.  Students will create assignments, including instructions, criteria for completion and development of grading rubrics.  Students will engage in continuous improvement and assessment of their learning assignments.      

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Examine barriers to educational technology use in teaching and learning.
    2. Create pedagogically sound learning assignments using educational technology.
    3. Relate TPACK elements to development of learning assignments.
    4. Construct evaluation criteria and assessment measures for learning assignments. 
  
  •  

    ALHT 603 - Effective Design and Delivery of Online Courses


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): None

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course provides learners with the opportunity to examine approaches to development and delivery of effective online courses.  Learners will discuss considerations for development of the structural and functional aspects of online courses along with technology-based teaching strategies for engaging and evaluating online students.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course: Discuss structural aspects of online course design using technology-based approaches

    Appraise various approaches to functional aspects of online courses

    Examine the roles of instructors in onlincourse presence, interactivity, and student engagement

    Create technology-rich assignments and evaluation measures

    Synthesize aspects of online course development and delivery  


Anthropology

  
  •  

    ANTH 100 - Cultural Anthropology


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): None

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course is an introduction to the subject of human cultural diversity as well as similarity. Topics discussed include: evolutionary change; socio-political levels of organizations; kinship system analysis; marriage systems; political, economic, and religious behavioral systems; language; and personality research.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Students will be familiar with basic concepts of the whole discipline of Anthropology
    2. Students will understand the basic theoretical approaches to the understanding of human cultural variation.
    3. Students will be familiar with core cultural institutions
    4. Students will be familiar with the prime cultural anthropological methodology - participant observation.
  
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    ANTH 110 - Human Origins


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): None

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course examines the human as a biological organism as we adapt to various social and ecological environments. Primary topics covered include population genetics, primatology, human evolution, and human variability.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Students will demonstrate an understanding of the methods social scientists use to explore social phenomena, including observation, hypothesis development, measurement and data collection, experimentation, evaluation of evidence, and employment of mathematical and interpretive analysis.
    2. Students will demonstrate knowledge of major concepts, models and issues of at least one discipline in the social sciences.
    3. Students will demonstrate knowledge of evolutionary theory as a framework for understanding human origins.
    4. Students will demonstrate an understanding of the methods scientists use to explore natural phenomena, including observation, hypothesis development, measurement and data collection, experimentation, evaluation of evidence, and employment of mathematical analysis.
    5. Students will apply scientific data, concepts, and models in one of the natural sciences.
  
  •  

    ANTH 296 - Advanced Study in Anthropology - lower division


    Credit Hours: 1-4
    Lecture Hours: 1-4
    Laboratory Hours: 1-4

    Prerequisite(s): None

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    The faculty member and student develop an area of study not within an approved course. Advanced study provides a very able and highly motivated student the opportunity to explore a topic of study in greater depth and breadth.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Demonstrate the ability to work independently.

    2. Demonstrate proficiency in the specific area of study.

  
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    ANTH 300 - Survey of World Cultures


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): Two social science courses

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    A survey of the major cultures of the world, this course emphasizes analysis and explanation of cultural differences, with the intent of facilitating a greater degree of ease in possible intercultural contact situations.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Students will understand the basic concepts in cultural anthropology, esp. culture
    2. Students will be familiar with culture areas of the world, along with the political entities associated with the cultural areas
    3. Students will be able to identify and assess cultural universalities
    4. Students should be able to assess cultural differences in the context of social and environmental variation
    5. Students will familiarize themselves with the basic methods of cultural anthropology, especially of participant observation and interviewing
  
  •  

    ANTH 496 - Advanced Study in Anthropology - upper division


    Credit Hours: 1-4
    Lecture Hours: 1-4
    Laboratory Hours: 1-4

    Prerequisite(s): None

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    The faculty member and student develop an area of study not within an approved course. Advanced study provides a very able and highly motivated student the opportunity to explore a topic of study in greater depth and breadth.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Demonstrate the ability to work independently.

    2. Demonstrate proficiency in the specific area of study.


Architectural Technology

  
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    ARCH 110 - Residential Documentation & Detailing


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 1.5
    Laboratory Hours: 3

    Prerequisite(s): None

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course introduces the student to the fundamentals of light wood frame construction within a residential context. Students will explore basic material and components used in building assemblies. Students will also be introduced to the fundamentals of computer aided drawing tools and techniques to document a light wood frame building using architectural drawing conventions.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Develop basic Architectural CAD skills
    2. Apply drawing conventions for light frame residential buildings
    3. Produce a set of industry standard working drawings for a small residence including the use of dimensions, notes and symbols on plans, sections and elevation drawings
    4. Apply drawing standards including scale, title, boarder and title blocks to architectural construction documents
    5. Define and explain basic methods and materials of residential construction
    6. Apply standard material sizes and standard material assemblies in residential working drawing
  
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    ARCH 115 - Freehand Drawing


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Laboratory Hours: 1

    Prerequisite(s): None

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course first introduces strategies that refine students’ ability to see and understand complex visual characteristics such as shape and form and then to record what is discerned accurately and expressively with pencil on paper. The course then introduces basic principles of design and composition in black and white and in color. Students are then encouraged to explore more personal interpretations of real and imagined objects by employing any or all of the preceding skills and strategies in a variety of sketching and design assignments. This course is also listed as ARTS 115 .

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Student will demonstrate understanding of at least one principal form of artistic expression and the creative process inherent therein.
  
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    ARCH 120 - Architectural Graphics


    Credit Hours: 1
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Laboratory Hours: 3

    Prerequisite(s): None

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course introduces students to the principles of descriptive geometry as applied to architectural drawing and includes principles of orthographic, paraline, and perspective projection, as well as shade and shadow projection, with an introduction to rendering in pencil.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Students will reproduce architectural lettering and label components within drawings throughout the term.
    2. Draw 2-dimensional objects (plan view & elevations) to scale, using drafting equipment and an architect’s or engineer’s scale.
    3. Proficiently create isometric and multi-point perspective drawings.
    4. Correctly reproduce/create 2-dimensional drawings of various building systems and sections.
  
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    ARCH 125 - Architectural Design Graphics


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Laboratory Hours: 6

    Prerequisite(s): None

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    In this foundational design studio, students will be introduced to fundamental architectural design thinking, iterative design, design communication (both verbal and written), and architectural drawing techniques. Students will develop their architectural tool kit by developing a series of projects exploring drawing standards, relevant precedent, design iteration, and creative problem-solving.
     

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:  

    1. Understand professional communication methods and architectural orthographic drawings.

    2. Use the iterative design processes to develop projects.

    3. Describe aesthetic goals for both building and site.

    4. Formulate design solutions that incorporate user requirements.

  
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    ARCH 135 - Arch Design Fundamentals


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Laboratory Hours: 6

    Prerequisite(s): ARCH 125  

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    In this foundational design studio, students will develop their understanding of architectural design thinking, iterative design, design communication (both verbal and written), and architectural drawing techniques. Students will apply this knowledge to develop a series of architectural design projects. These projects will focus on small-scale architectural interventions and require students to hone their creative thinking to develop an architectural response.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:  

    1. Understand professional communication methods and architectural orthographic drawings.

    2. Use the iterative design processes to develop projects.

    3. Describe aesthetic goals for both building and site.

    4. Formulate design solutions that incorporate user requirements.

  
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    ARCH 210 - Architectural Design I


    Credit Hours: 4
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Laboratory Hours: 6

    Prerequisite(s): ARCH 135  

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    In this design studio, students will apply their technical and conceptual knowledge to develop a series of increasingly complex architectural design projects.  These projects will challenge students to utilize previous design tools while synthesizing new core principles. These core principles will focus the work on topics such as formal arrangement, sustainability, MEP, community engagement, spatial planning, regulatory/code parameters, iterative design, use of precedent, habitable space, and human occupancy.  

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:  

    1. Apply professional communication methods including writing, speaking and creating clear and accurate presentation graphics and architectural orthographic drawings.

    2. Apply iterative design processes to develop projects.

    3. Analyze how a design is attractive and enhances human experience and the site and community they are built in.

    4. Formulate design solutions that incorporate user requirements and sustainable solutions and relevant regulations.

  
  •  

    ARCH 220 - Commercial Documentation & Detailing


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 1.5
    Laboratory Hours: 3

    Prerequisite(s): ARCH 110  

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This second documentation and detailing course introduces the student to the fundamentals of materials and components in building assemblies for commercial construction. Students will also be introduced to the fundamentals of building information modelling tools and techniques to document a commercial building.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Understand commercial building systems; including masonry, precast concrete, steel, cast-in- place concrete and pre-engineered buildings.
    2. Be able to layout and draw commercial building working drawings; including sections, plans, elevations and details.
    3. Reinforce and further develop quality CAD skills required in the design office.
    4. Productive usage of SketchUp software for creation of 3D details
    5. Introduction and implementation of Building Information Modeling (BIM) utilizingAutodesk “Revit Architecture” for use in 3D design.
  
  •  

    ARCH 240 - Architectural Design II


    Credit Hours: 4
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Laboratory Hours: 6

    Prerequisite(s): ARCH 210  

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    In this final lower-division design studio students will be able to synthesize, organize and prepare clear and articulate architectural proposals that present the skills learned in the previous three semesters. Additionally, students will conclude this sequence by applying new concepts such as the integration of sustainable and mechanical systems, architectural detailing, and integrating digital design software into their final presentations.
     

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:  

    1. Apply professional communication methods including writing, speaking and creating clear and accurate presentation graphics and architectural orthographic drawings.

    2. Apply iterative design processes to develop projects.

    3. Analyze how a design is attractive and enhances human experience and the site and community they are built in.

    4. Formulate design solutions that incorporate user requirements and sustainable solutions and relevant regulations.

  
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    ARCH 250 - Architectural Digital Design I


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Laboratory Hours: 2

    Prerequisite(s): ARCH 110  and ARCH 120  

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course introduces students to three-dimensional computer modeling and techniques for the digital production of architectural renderings. Students apply “3-D” techniques to buildings and other architectural features. Photo-realistic renderings and walk-throughs are covered.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Prepare a mid-term and final presentation to support the verbal presentation.
    2. Design rational and response to the project is visually narrated by drawings and models which clearly communicate the stated intent of the project.
  
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    ARCH 296 - Advanced Study in Architectural Technology - lower division


    Credit Hours: 1-4
    Lecture Hours: 1-4
    Laboratory Hours: 1-4

    Prerequisite(s): None

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    The faculty member and student develop an area of study not within an approved course. Advanced study provides a very able and highly motivated student the opportunity to explore a topic of study in greater depth and breadth.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Demonstrate the ability to work independently.
    2. Demonstrate proficiency in the specific area of study.
  
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    ARCH 300 - Architectural Digital Design II


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Laboratory Hours: 2

    Prerequisite(s): ARCH 250 

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course introduces students to advanced three-dimensional and parametric computer modeling and techniques for the digital production of architectural renderings. Students apply “3-D” techniques to buildings and other architectural features. Photo-realistic renderings and walk-throughs are covered.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Prepare a mid-term and final presentation to support the verbal presentation.
    2. Design rational and response to the project is visually narrated by drawings and models which clearly communicate the stated intent of the project.
  
  •  

    ARCH 305 - Topics in Theory


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): HUMN 241  & HUMN 242  

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    Architecture comprises a diverse and often complex network of histories, manifestos, and philosophies that create a working language. Through a curated progression of architecturally focused written critiques, seminar exercises, drawing assignements, and personal explorations, students are challenged to grapple with and be exposed to contemporary architectural discourse.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Analyze critical architectural and philosophical texts in order to support conclusions related to specific projects or assignments.
    2. Compare and interpret divergent histories of architecture and the cultural norms of a variety of indigenous, vernacular, local, and regional settings in terms of their political, economic, social, and technological factors.
    3. Generate drawn responses to concepts that synthesize their understanding of readings and discussions
  
  •  

    ARCH 315 - Special Topics in Architecture


    Credit Hours: 1-3:1-3,0-2
    Lecture Hours: 1-3
    Laboratory Hours: Varies

    Prerequisite(s): ARCH 135 , or by permission of instructor 

    Restriction(s): Permission of Construction Management faculty required. Construction Management majors only. Junior or higher class level.

    Corequisite(s): None

    Special Topics in Architecture will provide students opportunities to study pertinent issues related to the study of Architecture. Topics of study will draw upon faculty members areas of research interest and expertise at an elevated level of rigor. Course may be repeated for credit with different topics.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Variable, based upon specific topic selected by faculty member.
  
  •  

    ARCH 330 - Architectural Design III


    Credit Hours: 6
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Laboratory Hours: 12

    Prerequisite(s): ARCH 240  or permission of the instructor

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    In this first upper-division design studio students will investigate the cultural, historic, and environmental characteristics of a community and apply these contextual principles to a building and site design project. The connection between technical details and human experience will be explored by studying building structures, aesthetics, and urban context and applying these lessons in an integrated design solution.  

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:  

    1. Demonstrate professional communication methods including writing, speaking and creating clear and accurate presentation graphics and architectural orthographic drawings.

    2. Demonstrate the iterative design processes in developing projects.

    3. Design contextually to meets aesthetic goals, enhances human experience and improve the site and community in which the project is located.

    4. Formulate design solutions that incorporate user requirements, basic technical details and sustainable solutions.

  
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    ARCH 345 - Sustainable Systems I


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): ARCH 220  

    Restriction(s): N/A

    Corequisite(s): N/A

    This course introduces the student to the fundamentals of environmental systems. Students will explore sustainable design principles including passive design strategies and active MEP building systems and how they relate to building systems, site, region, and human health and safety. This course focuses on energy use and materials in buildings and architecture.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:  

    1. Explain the concept of sustainability.

    2. Understand how environmental systems and building materials impact human health, economy and the environment.

    3. Examine passive and active environmental systems for building design.

    4. Analyze relevant code, safety regulation and rating systems that impact building environmental systems.

    5. Analyze how site and region impact environmental systems and sustainable design.

  
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    ARCH 350 - Sustainable Systems II


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): ARCH 220  

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    In this second environmental systems course, students will explore sustainable design strategies for water, lighting and acoustics and how they relate to building systems, site, region, and human health and safety.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:  

    1. Explain the concept of sustainability.

    2. Understand how water, lighting and acoustics impact human health, economy and the environment.

    3. Examine passive and active water, lighting and acoustics systems for building design.

    4. Analyze relevant code, safety regulation and rating systems that impact building water, lighting and acoustics.

    5. Analyze how site and region impact water, lighting, acoustics, and sustainable design. ​

  
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    ARCH 370 - Architectural Design IV


    Credit Hours: 6
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Laboratory Hours: 12

    Prerequisite(s): ARCH 330  or permission of the instructor

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    In this design studio, students will build from the previous semester’s coursework and be introduced to sustainable urban design and planning. Social, economic, and environmental considerations will be used to create a new community and the architecture, public spaces, and infrastructure that define that community. Architectural details such as structures, facades, materials, and building components will also be tied into larger urban design principles about how people live, inhabit, and grow a community.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:  

     

    1. Demonstrate professional communication methods including writing, speaking and creating clear and accurate presentation graphics and architectural orthographic drawings.

    2. Demonstrate the iterative design processes in developing projects.

    3. Design contextually to meets aesthetic goals, enhances human experience and improve the site and community in which the project is located.

    4. Formulate design solutions that incorporate user requirements, basic technical details and sustainable solutions.

  
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    ARCH 371 - Architectural Theory


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Laboratory Hours: 2

    Prerequisite(s): ARCH 330 ; HUMN 242 

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    Study abroad program in Italy with an emphasis on the history and architecture of the Renaissance.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. SLO 1: Drawing Fundamentals Apply fundamental principles of drafting to the preparation of residential and commercial construction drawings, including plans, sections, elevations, schedules, details, and specifications.
    2. SLO 3: Presentation Techniques Employ traditional graphic means, both drawings and models, to illustrate and orally present completed design projects.
    3. SLO 5: Architectural History Attain basic understanding of Architectural History from pre-history to the present.Employ traditional graphic means, both drawings and models, to illustrate and orally present completed design projects.
  
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    ARCH 400 - Architectural Internship


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Laboratory Hours: 9

    Prerequisite(s): None

    Restriction(s): Junior status in the architectural B.T. or B.Arch. curriculum

    Corequisite(s): None

    Students will gain relevant experience in a real-world architectural work environment. Specific work experience will include and count towards those required for the National Council of Architectural Registration Board’s (NCARB) Architectural Experience Program (AXP). A minimum of 135 hours of acceptable and verifiable work experience will be expected. The internship can be completed at any time during the Junior, Senior or 5th-Year of the BT and B.ARCH. programs.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Demonstrate the technical experience required for entry level position as related to at least two of six prescribed AXP experience areas.
    2. Demonstrate professional communication skills and employment experience gained through a professionally structured internship.
  
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    ARCH 401 - Portfolio Preparation


    Credit Hours: 1
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): ARCH 250  

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    An introduction to advanced graduate level Architectural Education expectations and/or career paths open to students upon completion of Delhi’s 4-year Architectural Design/Build BT degree. Investigation of job search requirements and related documentation of prior completed work/experience (i.e. Portfolio + Resume design). In depth review of salary ranges, geographic work profiles and graduate level scholastic curricula will be reviewed. Additional individual chosen student path preparation will be undertaken in completion of course work. Issues of NCARB regulated professional internship and Architectural licensure requirements will be reviewed. Each student upon completion of the course will be required to submit a professional portfolio geared for either graduate admissions or use in interview for entry into the work place.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Identify basic principles of graphic design as related to portfolio presentations and other similar graphic expressions.
    2. Create an attractive and informative architectural portfolio.
    3. Identify the components of a resume and the ability to develop a resume for themselves.
    4. Identify the components of a cover letter and the ability to develop a cover letter for themselves.
    5. Recognize how to prepare for and conduct themselves in an interview.
  
  •  

    ARCH 410 - Building Codes & Professional Practices


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): Junior standing or permission of the instructor

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    An exposure to the legal, management and business aspects of architecture (with applications to engineering and construction management)

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Understanding history of and reasons for building and zoning codes and familiarity with the content and use of both
    2. Awareness of other practice “controls,” including education, licensure, ethics, liability and contracts
    3. Identification of personal skills and traits helpful towards contributing to and advancing in the profession of architecture
    4. Knowledge of the organization and structure of architectural firms and of typical project-oriented teams
    5. Familiarity with project scopes and comprehension of successful project management techniques
    6. Understanding of basic business aspects and considerations of professional practice
  
  •  

    ARCH 430 - Architectural Design V


    Credit Hours: 6
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Laboratory Hours: 12

    Prerequisite(s): ARCH 370  

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    In this first advanced design studio, students will integrate the architectural concepts, both technical and conceptual, that they have learned previously while simultaneously implementing personal design concepts into a semester-long project. Final submissions will include detailed architectural drawings, a deep understanding of precedent and their application, a clear position towards site/context, articulate presentation, a reasonable application of structural, MEP, and regulatory conditions, and a clear concept.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:  

    1. Professionally communicate by writing, speaking and creating clear and accurate presentation graphics and architectural orthographic drawings.

    2. Develop projects and problem solve using the iterative design processes.

    3. Create designs that meet aesthetic goals, enhances human experience and improve the site and community they are built in.

    4. Formulate design solutions that incorporate user requirements, technical details and sustainable solutions.

  
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    ARCH 470 - Architectural Design VI


    Credit Hours: 6
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Laboratory Hours: 12

    Prerequisite(s): ARCH 430  

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    In this second advanced design studio, students will develop an architectural project that synthesizes the architectural, structural, mechanical, regulatory, and conceptual concepts learned over the previous semesters in response to an architectural design brief. This semester long project will be prepared with a clear design intent, be thoughtfully organized, technically proficient, and link theory to practice.  

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:  

    1. Professionally communicate by writing, speaking and creating clear and accurate presentation graphics and architectural orthographic drawings.

    2. Develop projects and problem solve using the iterative design processes.

    3. Create designs that meet aesthetic goals, enhances human experience and improve the site and community they are built in.

    4. Formulate comprehensive design solutions that incorporate user requirements, technical details and sustainable solutions in an integrated manner.

  
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    ARCH 496 - Advanced Study in Architectural Technology - upper division


    Credit Hours: 1-4
    Lecture Hours: 1-4
    Laboratory Hours: 1-4

    Prerequisite(s): None

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    The faculty member and student develop an area of study not within an approved course. Advanced study provides a very able and highly motivated student the opportunity to explore a topic of study in greater depth and breadth.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Demonstrate the ability to work independently.
    2. Demonstrate proficiency in the specific area of study.
  
  •  

    ARCH 520 - Thesis Research


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): Junior studio

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    Thesis Research will be a catalyst for developing and clarifying concepts to be explored, possible project ideas to be tested, and research completed in a specific area of interest within an architectural discourse. Satisfactory completion of this course is required to advance into ARCH 570 .

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Construct a body of work; written, visual and verbal, that responds to the complex discourse within the field of architecture.
    2. Discover a broad scope of theoretical thinking that has influenced our current ideas of the build environment.
    3. Imagine a personal design thesis by engaging in both written and visual investigations.
  
  •  

    ARCH 530 - Architectural Design VII


    Credit Hours: 6
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Laboratory Hours: 12

    Prerequisite(s): ARCH 470  with a C+ or higher

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This comprehensive design studio focuses on technical concerns critical to the practice of architecture such as lighting, materials, structures, building envelopes and code requirements. These technical elements are studied through the lens of sustainability and integrated design. Technical software is used to analyze and document the building design.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:  

    1. Professionally communicate by writing, speaking and creating clear and accurate presentation graphics and architectural orthographic drawings.

    2. Develop projects and problem solve using the iterative design processes.

    3. Create designs that meet aesthetic goals, enhances human experience and improve the site and community they are built in.

    4. Formulate comprehensive design solutions that incorporate user requirements, comprehensive technical details and sustainable solutions in an integrated manner.

  
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    ARCH 570 - Thesis Studio


    Credit Hours: 6
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Laboratory Hours: 12

    Prerequisite(s): ARCH 520  & ARCH 530 , min. grades in both courses = C

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    Thesis Studio is the culminating design studio for all 5th year seniors completing a Bachelors of Architecture. Under the supervision of a faculty member students will investigate an architectural thesis generated in Thesis Research. This “site” of work will provide students with an opportunity to focus and produce a person architectural response.
    Completion of this course and submission of a final Degree Project Portfolio will be required to graduate.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:  

    1. Professionally communicate by writing, speaking and creating clear and accurate presentation graphics and architectural orthographic drawings.

    2. Develop projects and problem solve using the iterative design processes.

    3. Create designs that meet aesthetic goals, enhances human experience and improve the site and community they are built in.

    4.  Formulate comprehensive design solutions that incorporate user requirements, technical details and sustainable solutions in an integrated manner.


Art

  
  •  

    ARTS 103 - History of American Popular Music


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): None

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    The subject matter of this course is the development of popular music styles in the United States from 1840 to the present. The curriculum highlights the individuals responsible for the creation of long-lasting American musical styles.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. SUNY GE 8: Students will demonstrate understanding of at least one principal form of artistic expression and the creative process inherent therein.
  
  •  

    ARTS 104 - Ceramics I


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Laboratory Hours: 4

    Prerequisite(s): None

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    In this course the plastic characteristics of clay are explored through experiments in construction, throwing on the wheel, hand building, and other means of fabrication. Students experiment with mass and texture, form and context in functional and non-functional objects.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. SUNY GE 8: Students will demonstrate understanding of at least one principal form of artistic expression and the creative process inherent therein.

    Students will be able to:

    1. Identify the elements of art, and principles of design using descriptive language; and articulate supported interpretations of select works.
    2. Create original artwork in which students effectively utilize the elements of art and principles of design.
    3. Demonstrate technical proficiency in the creation of functional ceramic constructions. Describe the properties and limitations of clay and glazes.
    4. Practice good studio management skills in the maintenance of a healthy studio environment.

  
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    ARTS 105 - History of Country Music


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): None

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    The course will look at how country music absorbed other musical styles including big band, jazz and rock and roll, and at how the development of the music has mirrored cultural and social changes in the United States.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. SUNY GE 8: Students will demonstrate understanding of at least one principal form of artistic expression and the creative process inherent therein.
  
  •  

    ARTS 110 - History of Rock Music


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): None

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course is a selective but comprehensive overview of the musical style known as “rock and roll.” The course historically follows rock’s beginning as a child of Afro- American musical styles and continues through its development into the 1980’s. The course emphasizes and explores: the absorption of black music and culture into the conservative white lifestyle of the 1950’s; the adoption of rock music as a signature expression of the “baby-boom” culture of the 1960’s; the diffusion of the rock music of the 1970’s into diverse styles, including progressive rock; and the incorporation of characteristics of European classical music.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. SUNY GE 8: Students will demonstrate understanding of at least one principal form of artistic expression and the creative process inherent therein.
  
  •  

    ARTS 112 - Music in Black and White


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): None

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course examines the contributions of Afro-Americans in popular music and entertainment styles in America. Highlighting these areas will be the underlying theme of their initial acceptance or rejection by middle-class and upper-class white society.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. SUNY GE 8: Students will demonstrate understanding of at least one principal form of artistic expression and the creative process inherent therein.
  
  •  

    ARTS 115 - Freehand Drawing


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Laboratory Hours: 2

    Prerequisite(s): None

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course first introduces strategies that refine students’ ability to see and understand complex visual characteristics such as shape and form and then to record what is discerned accurately and expressively with pencil on paper. The course then introduces basic principles of design and composition in black and white and in color. Students are then encouraged to explore more personal interpretations of real and imagined objects by employing any or all of the preceding skills and strategies in a variety of sketching and design assignments. This course is also listed as ARCH 115 .

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Student will demonstrate understanding of at least one principal form of artistic expression and the creative process inherent therein.
  
  •  

    ARTS 120 - Introduction to Painting


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Laboratory Hours: 2

    Prerequisite(s): None

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course is an introduction to the materials, techniques and practices of acrylic painting. The student will acquire experience with a broad range of techniques, subject matter and approaches. Different styles of art will be explored to provide a context for students to develop their own personal language and style. Lectures with visual materials provided by the instructor and reading assignments wil be the basis for hands-on painting assignments. The emphasis is on studio work.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. SUNY GE 8: Students will demonstrate understanding of at least one principal form of artistic expression and the creative process inherent therein.

    Students will be able to:

    1. Identify the elements of art, and principles of design using descriptive language; and articulate supported interpretations of select works.
    2. Create original artwork in which students effectively utilize the elements of art.
    3. Demonstrate basic acrylic painting techniques and the fundamentals of color theory.

  
  •  

    ARTS 200 - Color Theory


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 1
    Laboratory Hours: 4

    Prerequisite(s): ARTS 115 , or ARTS 120 , or HUMN 101 , or HORT 125 , or ARCH 120 , or ARCH 125  with a C or higher, or permission of Instructor.

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This is a lecture/studio course with emphasis on practical applications of color in painting. With an introduction to the skills of perception the student is led through a series of exercises to gain visual acuity, skills in the perception of color and color relationships as well as skill in the application of paint. Using cut paper and water soluble (odor-free) gouache paint the student will explore the basic structure of color involving accurate perception and manipulation of color across its three attributes: hue, value and intensity. Art History, theory, and criticism are addressed through presentations and group critiques.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course: Student will demonstrate an understanding of at least one principal form of artistic expression and the creative process inherent therein

    SUNY Delhi Student Learning Outcomes in the Arts:

    The student will:

    1. identify the elements of art and the principles of design using descriptive language and articulate supported interpretations of select works.
    2. create original artwork in which they effectively utilize the elements of art and the principles of design.
    3. demonstrate skills and techniques used by artists to achieve the illusion of form and space in mindfully composed paintings and drawings in a variety of media through the successful manipulation of color across its three attributes of hue, value and intensity.

  
  •  

    ARTS 250 - Graphic Design


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 2
    Laboratory Hours: 2

    Prerequisite(s): (COMM 101 , or ARTS 115 , or ARTS 120 , or HUMN 101 , or HORT 125 , or ARCH 120 , or ARCH 125 , or CULN 290 , or CITA 140 ) with a C or higher, or permission of Instructor.

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This lecture/studio course will introduce students to the elements of art and the principles of design working with 2-dimensional, hand-crafted and digital media.  The course will explore how to use images and text in planned compositions to create an original, visual identity and to communicate effectively with intended audiences. 

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Analyze the elements of art, and principles of design using descriptive writing; and articulate supported interpretations of select works.
    2. Create original graphics in which students effectively utilize the elements of art and principles of design.
    3. Demonstrate skills and techniques used by graphic artists to create compositions of images and text that communicate successfully with the desired audience
  
  •  

    ARTS 296 - Advanced Study in Art - lower division


    Credit Hours: 1-4
    Lecture Hours: 1-4
    Laboratory Hours: 1-4

    Prerequisite(s): None

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    The faculty member and student develop an area of study not within an approved course. Advanced study provides a very able and highly motivated student the opportunity to explore a topic of study in greater depth and breadth.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Demonstrate the ability to work independently.
    2. Demonstrate proficiency in the specific area of study.
  
  •  

    ARTS 300 - Art and Health


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 100  or ENGL 200  or permission of instructor

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This on-line course surveys various art principles and concepts together with their historical development as shown in representative works of painting, sculpture, architecture and landscape architecture drawn from the healthcare field. To illustrate the influence of arts on the evolution of healthcare, art will be examined in categories based on use for: direct healing, educating practitioners, recording of historical medical events, therapy, reforming the medical system, memorializing and grieving, and for exploring new frontiers in the medical field.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. SUNY GE 8: Students will demonstrate understanding of at least one principal form of artistic expression and the creative process inherent therein.

    Students will be able to:

    1. Analyze the elements of art, and principles of design using descriptive writing; and articulate supported interpretations of select works.
    2. Create original artwork in which students effectively utilize the elements of art and principles of design to demonstrate key characteristics of select styles/periods.
    3. Explain major developments in the history of art, and how socio-cultural change has affected artists.
    4. Synthesize research from primary and secondary sources to explore the historical and/or contemporary impact of the arts in healthcare.

  
  •  

    ARTS 310 - The Art of Healing Landscapes


    Credit Hours: 3
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 0

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 100  or permission of instructor

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course surveys various art principles and concepts together with their historical development as shown in representative works of painting, photography, architecture and landscape architecture focused on healing landscapes. Healing designs from many cultures will be examined from pre-history to the present around the following themes: landscape and memory, ancient places of power, gardens for holistic care, meditation gardens, spiritual symbolism, medicinal gardens, restorative landscapes, trends in hospital designs, failed healing landscapes, evidence based design, memorials, and therapeutic landscapes.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. SUNY GE 8: Students will demonstrate understanding of at least one principal form of artistic expression and the creative process inherent therein.

    Students will be able to:

    1. Analyze the elements of art, and principles of design using descriptive writing; and articulate supported interpretations of select works.
    2. Create original artwork in which students effectively utilize the elements of art and principles of design to demonstrate key characteristics of select styles/periods.
    3. Explain major developments in the history of landscape design, and how socio-cultural change has affected landscape designers.
    4. Synthesize research from primary and secondary sources to explore the historical and/or contemporary impact of landscapes in healthcare.

  
  •  

    ARTS 496 - Advanced Study in Art - upper division


    Credit Hours: 1-4
    Lecture Hours: 1-4
    Laboratory Hours: 1-4

    Prerequisite(s): None

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    The faculty member and student develop an area of study not within an approved course. Advanced study provides a very able and highly motivated student the opportunity to explore a topic of study in greater depth and breadth.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Demonstrate the ability to work independently.
    2. Demonstrate proficiency in the specific area of study.

Automotive

  
  •  

    AUTO 115 - Auto Brake System


    Credit Hours: 4
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 3

    Prerequisite(s): None

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course covers the theory, operation, maintenance, and repair of automotive and light truck brake systems. The main emphasis is on brake maintenance, service, and diagnostic troubleshooting through a reasonable understanding of brake theory. The laboratory component of the course includes various activities that follow the guidelines of the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF) and the National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence (ASE).

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Define and demonstrate safe workplace practices.
    2. Understand and apply basic hydraulic principles including Pascal’s law.
    3. Perform routine service and maintenance to passenger cars, light trucks and SUV’s as it relates to the brake, steering and suspension systems.
    4. Demonstrate diagnostic and repair knowledge/skills in the areas of brake, steering and suspension systems.
    5. Access and interpret diagnostic and service repair information from computerized and text based sources.
    6. Diagnose and repair a variety of brake, steering and suspension system related concerns on vehicles.
    7. Demonstrate respectable work place skills required by the automotive repair industry.
  
  •  

    AUTO 118 - Automotive Suspension Systems


    Credit Hours: 4
    Lecture Hours: 3
    Laboratory Hours: 3

    Prerequisite(s): None

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course includes the theory and principles of the operation, construction, maintenance, and repair of steering and suspension system components. It includes both standard and power steering and both front and rear suspension systems of passenger cars, light duty trucks, and sport utility vehicles. The laboratory component of this course includes various activities that follow the guidelines of the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF) and the National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence (ASE).

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Identify safety hazards pertaining to steering and suspension system service.
    2. Identify various steering and suspension components.
    3. Explain how to properly test various steering and suspension components.
    4. Perform maintenance servicing, diagnostic testing and repair of the steering and suspension systems.
    5. Perform front and rear wheel alignment on various vehicles to manufactures specifications.
  
  •  

    AUTO 119 - Auto Suspensions & Steering WE


    Credit Hours: 1
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Laboratory Hours: 6

    Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of ASE test A4 (Steering and Suspension) and approval of academic advisor

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course consists of a 90-hour work experience in a repair shop setting where the student will perform diagnosis and repairs to all steering components, front and rear suspensions, wheel alignments, wheels and tires, and other system components as relates to the requirements of the AUTO 118  suspension systems course. The student will be supervised by management (preferably ASE certified) of the participating shop. Students are required to maintain a log of all tasks and clock hours completed. The cooperating supervisor and program faculty must approve the records before a grade is assigned and credit awarded.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Identify safety hazards pertaining to steering and suspension system service.
    2. Identify various steering and suspension components.
    3. Explain how to properly test various steering and suspension components.
    4. Perform maintenance servicing, diagnostic testing and repair of the steering and suspension systems.
    5. Perform front and rear wheel alignment on various vehicles to manufactures specifications.
  
  •  

    AUTO 121 - Introduction to Automotive Lab


    Credit Hours: 1
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Laboratory Hours: 3

    Prerequisite(s): None

    Restriction(s): Automotive Technology majors only

    Corequisite(s): None

    This is an automotive laboratory course that deals with the diagnosis and repair of common automotive problems. All diagnosis and repair is done under the supervision of faculty and staff. Service, diagnosis, and repair procedures are performed on customer-owned or College-owned vehicles to simulate working in the industry. Students also use this lab to preform required tasks related to the current semester courses.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Demonstrate correct use of hand tools and shop equipment.
    2. Perform routine maintenance/repair to passenger cars and light trucks.
    3. Demonstrate and apply diagnostic and repair skills in the areas of automotive chassis and electrical systems.
    4. Demonstrate respectable work place skills and safety procedures required by the automotive repair industry.
    5. Correctly analyze service information from computerized and conventional sources.
    6. Complete a work order that includes customer and vehicle information along with the concern, cause and correction of the vehicle.
  
  •  

    AUTO 124 - ASE Work Experience I


    Credit Hours: 2
    Lecture Hours: 0
    Laboratory Hours: 12

    Prerequisite(s): Approval of academic advisor

    Restriction(s): None

    Corequisite(s): None

    This course consists of a 180-hour work experience in a repair shop setting where the student will perform a variety of diagnostic and repair tasks with a focus on electrical and brake systems as relates to the requirements of the AUTO 115  brake systems and the AUTO 125  electrical I courses. The student will be supervised by management (preferably ASE certified) of the participating shop. Students are required to maintain a log of all tasks and clock hours completed. The cooperating supervisor and program faculty must approve the records before a grade is assigned and credit awarded.

    Student Learning Outcomes of the Course:
    1. Demonstrate correct use of hand tools and shop equipment.
    2. Perform routine maintenance/repair to passenger cars and light trucks.
    3. Demonstrate and apply diagnostic and repair skills in the areas of automotive chassis and electrical systems.
    4. Demonstrate respectable work place skills and safety procedures required by the automotive repair industry.
    5. Correctly analyze service information from computerized and conventional sources.
    6. Complete a work order that includes customer and vehicle information along with the concern, cause and correction of the vehicle.
 

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